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Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.
Posted 4 months ago by Mark Surman
Mozilla’s new tech policy fellowship brings together leading experts to advance Internet health around the world   Strong government policies and leadership are key to making the Internet a global public resource that is open and accessible to all. ... [More] To advance this work from the front lines, some of the world’s experts on these issues joined government service. These dedicated public servants have made major progress in recent years on issues like net neutrality, open data and the digital economy. But as governments transition and government leaders move on, we risk losing momentum or even backsliding on progress made. To sustain that momentum and invest in those leaders, today the Mozilla Foundation officially launches a new Tech Policy Fellowship. The program is designed to give individuals with deep expertise in government and Internet policy the support and structure they need to continue their Internet health work. The fellows, who hail from around the globe, will spend the next year working independently on a range of tech policy issues. They will collaborate closely with Mozilla’s policy and advocacy teams, as well as the broader Mozilla network and other key organizations in tech policy. Each fellow will bring their expertise to important topics currently at issue in the United States and around the world. For example: Fellow Gigi Sohn brings nearly 30 years of experience, most recently at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), dedicated to defending and preserving fundamental competition and innovation policies for broadband Internet access. At a time when we are moving closer to a closed Internet in the United States, her expertise is more valuable than ever. Fellow Alan Davidson will draw on his extensive professional history working to advance a free and open digital economy to support his work on education and advocacy strategies to combat Internet policy risks. With the wave of data collection and use fast growing in government and the private sector, fellow Linet Kwamboka will analyze East African government practices for the collection, handling and publishing of data. She will develop contextual best practices for data governance and management. Meet the initial cohort of the Tech Policy Fellows here and below, and keep an eye on the Tech Policy Fellowship website for ways to collaborate in this work.   Our Mozilla Tech Policy Fellows   Alan Davidson | @abdavdson Alan will work to produce a census of major Internet policy risks and will engage in advocacy and educational strategy to minimize those risks. Alan is also a Fellow at New America in Washington, D.C. Until January 2017, he served as the first Director of Digital Economy at the U.S. Department of Commerce and a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Commerce. Prior to joining the department, Davidson was the director of the Open Technology Institute at New America. Earlier, Davidson opened Google’s Washington policy office in 2005 and led the company’s public policy and government relations efforts in North and South America. He was previously Associate Director of the Center for Democracy and Technology. Alan has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science and a master’s degree in technology and policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is a graduate of Yale Law School.   Credit: New America Amina Fazlullah Amina Fazlullah will work to promote policies that support broadband connectivity in rural and vulnerable communities in the United States. Amina joins the fellowship from her most recent role as Policy Advisor to the National Digital Inclusion Alliance, where she led efforts to develop policies that support broadband deployment, digital inclusion, and digital equity efforts across the United States. Amina has worked on a broad range of Internet policy issues including Universal Service, consumer protection, antitrust, net neutrality, spectrum policy and children’s online privacy. She has testified before Congress, the Federal Communications Commission, the Department of Commerce and Federal Trade Commission. Amina was formerly the Benton Foundation’s Director of Policy in Washington, D.C., where she worked to further government policies to address communication needs of vulnerable communities. Before that, Amina worked with the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, for the Honorable Chief Judge James M. Rosenbaum of the U.S. District Court of Minnesota and at the Federal Communications Commission. She is graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School and Pennsylvania State University.   Camille Fischer | @camfisch Camille will be working to promote individual rights to privacy, security and free speech on the Internet. In the last year of the Obama Administration, Camille led the National Economic Council’s approach to consumers’ economic and civil rights on the Internet and in emerging technologies. She represented consumers’ voices in discussions with other federal agencies regarding law enforcement access to data, including encryption and international law enforcement agreements. She has run commercial privacy and security campaigns, like the BuySecure Initiative to increase consumers’ financial security, and also worked to promote an economic voice within national security policy and to advocate for due process protections within surveillance and digital access reform. Before entering the government as a Presidential Management Fellow, Camille graduated from Georgetown University Law Center where she wrote state legislation for the privacy-protective commercial use of facial recognition technology. Camille is also an amateur photographer in D.C.   Caroline Holland Caroline will be working to to promote a healthy internet by exploring current competition issues related to the Internet ecosystem. Caroline served most recently as Chief Counsel for Competition Policy and Intergovernmental Relations at the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division. In that role, she was involved in several high-profile matters while overseeing the Division’s competition policy and advocacy efforts, interagency policy initiatives, and congressional relations. Caroline previously served as Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the Senate Antitrust Subcommittee where she advised the committee chairmen on a wide variety of competition issues related to telecommunications, technology and intellectual property. Before taking on this role, she was a counsel on the Senate Judiciary Committee and an attorney in private practice focusing on public policy and regulatory work. Caroline holds a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and a B.A. in Public Policy from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Between college and law school, Caroline served in the Antitrust Division as an honors paralegal and as Clerk of the Senate Antitrust Subcommittee.   Linet Kwamboka | @linetdata Linet will work on understanding the policies that guide data collection and dissemination in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda). Through this, she aims to publish policy recommendations on existing policies, proposed policy amendments and a report outlining her findings. Linet is the Founder and CEO of DataScience LTD, which builds information systems to generate and use data to discover intelligent insights about people, products and services for resource allocation and decision making. She was previously the Kenya Open Data Initiative Project Coordinator for the Government of Kenya at the Kenya ICT Authority. Linet is also a director of the World Data Lab–Africa, working to make data personal, tangible and actionable to help citizens make better informed choices about their lives. She also consults with the UNDP in the Strengthening Electoral Processes in Kenya Project, offering support to the Independent Electoral Boundaries Commission in information systems and technology. She has worked at the World Bank as a GIS and Technology Consultant and was a Software Engineering Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. Her background is in computer science, data analysis and Geographical Information Systems. Linet is a recognized unsung hero by the American Embassy in Kenya in her efforts to encourage more women into technology and computing, has been a finalist in the Bloomberg award of global open data champions and is a member of the Open Data Institute Global Open Data Leaders’ Network.   Terah Lyons | @terahlyons Terah will work on advancing policy and governance around the future of machine intelligence, with a specific focus on coordination in international governance of AI. Her work targets questions related to the responsible development and deployment of AI and machine learning, including how society can minimize the risks of AI while maximizing its benefits, and what AI development and advanced automation means for humankind across cultural and political boundaries. Terah is a former Policy Advisor to the U.S. Chief Technology Officer in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She most recently led a policy portfolio in the Obama Administration focused on machine intelligence, including AI, robotics, and intelligent transportation systems. In her work at OSTP, Terah helped establish and direct the White House Future of Artificial Intelligence Initiative, oversaw robotics policy and regulatory matters, led the Administration’s work from the White House on civil and commercial unmanned aircraft systems/drone integration into the U.S. airspace system, and advised on Federal automated vehicles policy. She also advised on issues related to diversity and inclusion in the technology industry and entrepreneurial ecosystem. Prior to her work at the White House, Terah was a Fellow with the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences based in Cape Town, South Africa. She is a graduate of Harvard University, where she currently sits on the Board of Directors of the Harvard Alumni Association.   Marilia Monteiro Marilia will be analyzing consumer protection and competition policy to contribute to the development of sustainable public policies and innovation. From 2013-15, she was Policy Manager at the Brazilian Ministry of Justice’s Consumer Office coordinating public policies for the consumer protection in digital markets and law enforcement actions targeting ISP and Internet application. She has researched the intersection between innovation technologies and society in different areas: current democratic innovations in Latin America regarding e-participation at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung and the development of public policies on health privacy and data protection at the “Privacy Brazil” project with the Internet Lab in partnership with Ford Foundation in Brazil. She is a board member at Coding Rights, a Brazilian-born, women-led, think-and-do tank and active in Internet Governance fora. Marilia holds a Master in Public Policy from the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin focusing on policy analysis, a bachelor in Law from Fundação Getulio Vargas School of Law in Rio de Janeiro and specialises in digital rights.   Jason Schultz | @lawgeek Jason will analyze the impacts and effects of new technologies such as artificial intelligence/machine learning and the Internet of Things through the lenses of consumer protection, civil liberties, innovation, and competition. His research aims to help policymakers navigate these important legal concerns while still allowing for open innovation and for competition to thrive. Jason is a Professor of Clinical Law, Director of NYU’s Technology Law & Policy Clinic, and Co-Director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy. His clinical projects, research, and writing primarily focus on the ongoing struggles to balance traditional areas of law such as intellectual property, consumer protection, and privacy with the public interest in free expression, access to knowledge, civil rights, and innovation in light of new technologies and the challenges they pose. During the 2016-2017 academic year, Jason was on leave at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he served as Senior Advisor on Innovation and Intellectual Property to former U.S. Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith. With Aaron Perzanowski, he is the author of The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy (MIT Press 2016), which argues for retaining consumer property rights in a marketplace that increasingly threatens them. Prior to joining NYU, Jason was an Assistant Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at the UC Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall). Before joining Boalt Hall, he was a Senior Staff Attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and before that practiced intellectual property law at the firm of Fish & Richardson, PC. He also served as a clerk to the Honorable D. Lowell Jensen of the Northern District of California. He is a member of the American Law Institute.   Gigi Sohn | @gigibsohn Gigi will be working to promote an open Internet in the United States. She is one of the nation’s leading public advocates for open, affordable, and democratic communications networks. Gigi is also a Distinguished Fellow at the Georgetown Law Institute for Technology Law & Policy and an Open Society Foundations Leadership in Government Fellow. For nearly 30 years, Gigi has worked across the United States to defend and preserve the fundamental competition and innovation policies that have made broadband Internet access more ubiquitous, competitive, affordable, open, and protective of user privacy. Most recently, Gigi was Counselor to the former Chairman of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, Tom Wheeler, who she advised on a wide range of Internet, telecommunications and media issues. Gigi was named by the Daily Dot in 2015 as one of the “Heroes Who Saved the Internet” in recognition of her role in the FCC’s adoption of the strongest-ever net neutrality rules. Gigi co-founded and served as CEO of Public Knowledge, the leading communications policy advocacy organization. She was previously a Project Specialist in the Ford Foundation’s Media, Arts and Culture unit and Executive Director of the Media Access Project, the first public interest law firm in the communications space. Gigi holds a B.S. in Broadcasting and Film, Summa Cum Laude, from the Boston University College of Communication and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.   Cori Zarek | @corizarek Cori is the Senior Fellow leading the Tech Policy Fellows team and serving as a liaison with the Mozilla Foundation. Her work as a fellow will focus on the intersection of tech policy and transparency. Before joining Mozilla, Cori was Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer at the White House where she led the team’s work to build a more digital, open, and collaborative government. Cori also coordinated U.S. involvement with the global Open Government Partnership, a 75-country initiative driving greater transparency and accountability around the world. Previously, she was an attorney at the U.S. National Archives, working on open government and freedom of information policy.  Before joining the U.S. government, Cori was the Freedom of Information Director at The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press where she assisted journalists with legal issues, and she also practiced for a Washington law firm. Cori received her B.A. from the University of Iowa where she was editor of the student-run newspaper, The Daily Iowan. Cori also received her J.D. from the University of Iowa where she wrote for the Iowa Law Review and The Des Moines Register. She was inducted into the Freedom of Information Hall of Fame in 2016. Cori is also the President of the D.C. Open Government Coalition and teaches a media law class at American University. The post Increasing Momentum Around Tech Policy appeared first on The Mozilla Blog. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Josh Matthews
With the release of Firefox 54, we are pleased to welcome the 36 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 33 of whom were brand new volunteers! Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic ... [More] individuals, and take a look at their contributions: ahsan.r.kazmi: 1336282 dwivediaakar: 1334989 ivica.bogosavljevic: 1331352 kevin.kwong.chip: 1335409 seanmaltby: 1317643 Adrien Enault: 1327731, 1333385, 1341278 Andrey Mukamolow: 1331954 Anjul Tyagi: 1336022 Barun Parruck: 1334082, 1334796, 1343196 Chandler: 1332375 Cliff: 1334104 Colomban Wendling: 1308908 D. Richard Hipp: 1340028 Deepa: 1280572, 1334794, 1341036, 1341047, 1341056 Dimitry Andric: 1329520 Dorel Barbu: 1228478 Eduardo Bouças: 1320233, 1337737 Fabien Casters: 1326408 Geoff Brown: 1300017, 1305241, 1317662, 1318696, 1324470, 1333506, 1333836, 1335501, 1335944, 1337523, 1339594, 1340175, 1342963, 1343549 Himanshi Jain: 1289785 Hiroshi Hatake: 675709 James Pearson: 1333720 Jesse Schwartzentruber: 1335411 Julien Cristau: 1336084 Kerem: 1242601 Kevin Gay: 1332644 Leonardo Couto: 1338284 Micah Tigley: 1308268, 1326412, 1337235, 1341498 Michał Górny: 1329798 Nick Fox: 1312687, 1337303, 1343489, 1343545 Noam Schmitt: 1341307, 1342022, 1342032 Svetlana Orlik: 1211726, 1336946, 1340108, 1342551 Ted Campbell: 1273858, 1332333, 1334187, 1334268, 1336216, 1337763, 1342483 Timothy Pan: 1331672 Tony: 1343163 Vineet Reddy: 1339400 flyingrub: 1342394 [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.18.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency. If you have a previous version of Rust installed, getting Rust 1.18 is as easy as: $ rustup ... [More] update stable If you don’t have it already, you can get rustup from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.18.0 on GitHub. What’s in 1.18.0 stable As usual, Rust 1.18.0 is a collection of improvements, cleanups, and new features. One of the largest changes is a long time coming: core team members Carol Nichols and Steve Klabnik have been writing a new edition of “The Rust Programming Language”, the official book about Rust. It’s being written openly on GitHub, and has over a hundred contributors in total. This release includes the first draft of the second edition in our online documentation. 19 out of 20 chapters have a draft; the draft of chapter 20 will land in Rust 1.19. When the book is done, a print version will be made available through No Starch Press, if you’d like a paper copy. We’re still working with the editors at No Starch to improve the text, but we wanted to start getting a wider audience now. The new edition is a complete re-write from the ground up, using the last two years of knowledge we’ve gained from teaching people Rust. You’ll find brand-new explanations for a lot of Rust’s core concepts, new projects to build, and all kinds of other good stuff. Please check it out and let us know what you think! As for the language itself, an old feature has learned some new tricks: the pub keyword has been expanded a bit. Experienced Rustaceans will know that items are private by default in Rust, and you can use the pub keyword to make them public. In Rust 1.18.0, pub has gained a new form: pub(crate) bar; The bit inside of () is a ‘restriction’, which refines the notion of how this is made public. Using the crate keyword like the example above means that bar would be public to the entire crate, but not outside of it. This makes it easier to declare APIs that are “public to your crate”, but not exposed to your users. This was possible with the existing module system, but often very awkward. You can also specify a path, like this: pub(in a::b::c) foo; This means “usable within the hierarchy of a::b::c, but not elsewhere.” This feature was defined in RFC 1422 and is documented in the reference. For our Windows users, Rust 1.18.0 has a new attribute, #![windows_subsystem]. It works like this: #![windows_subsystem(console)] #![windows_subsystem(windows)] These control the /SUBSYSTEM flag in the linker. For now, only console and windows are supported. When is this useful? In the simplest terms, if you’re developing a graphical application, and do not specify windows, a console window would flash up upon your application’s start. With this flag, it won’t. Finally, Rust’s tuples, enum variant fields, and structs (without #[repr]) have always had an unspecified layout. We’ve turned on automatic re-ordering, which can result in smaller sizes through reducing padding. Consider a struct like this: struct Suboptimal(u8, u16, u8); In previous versions of Rust on the x86_64 platform, this struct would have the size of six bytes. But looking at the source, you’d expect it to have four. The extra two bytes come from padding; given that we have a u16 here, it should be aligned to two bytes. But in this case, it’s at offset one. To move it to offset two, another byte of padding is placed after the first u8. To give the whole struct a proper alignment, another byte is added after the second u8 as well, giving us 1 + 1 (padding) + 2 + 1 + 1 (padding) = 6 bytes. But what if our struct looked like this? struct Optimal(u8, u8, u16); This struct is properly aligned; the u16 lies on a two byte boundary, and so does the entire struct. No padding is needed. This gives us 1 + 1 + 2 = 4 bytes. When designing Rust, we left the details of memory layout undefined for just this reason. Because we didn’t commit to a particular layout, we can make improvements to it, such as in this case where the compiler can optimize Suboptimal into Optimal automatically. And if you check the sizes of Suboptimal and Optimal on Rust 1.18.0, you’ll see that they both have a size of four bytes. We’ve been planning this change for a while; previous versions of Rust included this optimization on the nightly channel, but some people wrote unsafe code that assumed the exact details of the representation. We rolled it back while we fixed all instances of this that we know about, but if you find some code breaks due to this, please let us know so we can help fix it! Structs used for FFI can be given the #[repr(C)] annotation to prevent reordering, in addition to C-compatible field layout. We’ve been planning on moving rustdoc to use a CommonMark compliant markdown parser for a long time now. However, just switching over can introduce regressions where the CommonMark spec differs from our existing parser, Hoedown. As part of the transition plan, a new flag has been added to rustdoc, --enable-commonmark. This will use the new parser instead of the old one. Please give it a try! As far as we know, both parsers will produce identical results, but we’d be interested in knowing if you find a scenario where the rendered results differ! Finally, compiling rustc itself is now 15%-20% faster. Each commit message in this PR goes over the details; there were some inefficiencies, and now they’ve been cleaned up. See the detailed release notes for more. Library stabilizations Seven new APIs were stabilized this release: Child::try_wait is a non-blocking form of Child::wait. HashMap::retain and HashSet::retain bring the retain API Vec has to these two hash data structures. PeekMut::pop lets you pop the top element from a BinaryHeap after you’ve already peeked at it without needing to reorder the heap a second time. TcpStream::peek, UdpSocket::peek, UdpSocket::peek_from let you peek at a stream or socket. See the detailed release notes for more. Cargo features Cargo has added support for the Pijul VCS, which is written in Rust. cargo new my-awesome-project --vcs=pijul will get you going! To supplement the --all flag, Cargo now has several new flags such as --bins, --examples, --tests, and --benches, which will let you build all programs of that type. Finally, Cargo now supports Haiku and Android! See the detailed release notes for more. Contributors to 1.18.0 Many people came together to create Rust 1.18. We couldn’t have done it without all of you. Thanks! [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.18.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency. If you have a previous version of Rust installed, getting Rust 1.18 is as easy as: $ rustup ... [More] update stable If you don’t have it already, you can get rustup from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.18.0 on GitHub. What’s in 1.18.0 stable As usual, Rust 1.18.0 is a collection of improvements, cleanups, and new features. One of the largest changes is a long time coming: core team members Carol Nichols and Steve Klabnik have been writing a new edition of “The Rust Programming Language”, the official book about Rust. It’s being written openly on GitHub, and has over a hundred contributors in total. This release includes the first draft of the second edition in our online documentation. 19 out of 20 chapters have a draft; the draft of chapter 20 will land in Rust 1.19. When the book is done, a print version will be made available through No Starch Press, if you’d like a paper copy. We’re still working with the editors at No Starch to improve the text, but we wanted to start getting a wider audience now. The new edition is a complete re-write from the ground up, using the last two years of knowledge we’ve gained from teaching people Rust. You’ll find brand-new explanations for a lot of Rust’s core concepts, new projects to build, and all kinds of other good stuff. Please check it out and let us know what you think! As for the language itself, an old feature has learned some new tricks: the pub keyword has been expanded a bit. Experienced Rustaceans will know that items are private by default in Rust, and you can use the pub keyword to make them public. In Rust 1.18.0, pub has gained a new form: pub(crate) bar; The bit inside of () is a ‘restriction’, which refines the notion of how this is made public. Using the crate keyword like the example above means that bar would be public to the entire crate, but not outside of it. This makes it easier to declare APIs that are “public to your crate”, but not exposed to your users. This was possible with the existing module system, but often very awkward. You can also specify a path, like this: pub(in a::b::c) foo; This means “usable within the hierarchy of a::b::c, but not elsewhere.” This feature was defined in RFC 1422 and is documented in the reference. For our Windows users, Rust 1.18.0 has a new attribute, #![windows_subsystem]. It works like this: #![windows_subsystem = "console"] #![windows_subsystem = "windows"] These control the /SUBSYSTEM flag in the linker. For now, only "console" and "windows" are supported. When is this useful? In the simplest terms, if you’re developing a graphical application, and do not specify "windows", a console window would flash up upon your application’s start. With this flag, it won’t. Finally, Rust’s tuples, enum variant fields, and structs (without #[repr]) have always had an unspecified layout. We’ve turned on automatic re-ordering, which can result in smaller sizes through reducing padding. Consider a struct like this: struct Suboptimal(u8, u16, u8); In previous versions of Rust on the x86_64 platform, this struct would have the size of six bytes. But looking at the source, you’d expect it to have four. The extra two bytes come from padding; given that we have a u16 here, it should be aligned to two bytes. But in this case, it’s at offset one. To move it to offset two, another byte of padding is placed after the first u8. To give the whole struct a proper alignment, another byte is added after the second u8 as well, giving us 1 + 1 (padding) + 2 + 1 + 1 (padding) = 6 bytes. But what if our struct looked like this? struct Optimal(u8, u8, u16); This struct is properly aligned; the u16 lies on a two byte boundary, and so does the entire struct. No padding is needed. This gives us 1 + 1 + 2 = 4 bytes. When designing Rust, we left the details of memory layout undefined for just this reason. Because we didn’t commit to a particular layout, we can make improvements to it, such as in this case where the compiler can optimize Suboptimal into Optimal automatically. And if you check the sizes of Suboptimal and Optimal on Rust 1.18.0, you’ll see that they both have a size of four bytes. We’ve been planning this change for a while; previous versions of Rust included this optimization on the nightly channel, but some people wrote unsafe code that assumed the exact details of the representation. We rolled it back while we fixed all instances of this that we know about, but if you find some code breaks due to this, please let us know so we can help fix it! Structs used for FFI can be given the #[repr(C)] annotation to prevent reordering, in addition to C-compatible field layout. We’ve been planning on moving rustdoc to use a CommonMark compliant markdown parser for a long time now. However, just switching over can introduce regressions where the CommonMark spec differs from our existing parser, Hoedown. As part of the transition plan, a new flag has been added to rustdoc, --enable-commonmark. This will use the new parser instead of the old one. Please give it a try! As far as we know, both parsers will produce identical results, but we’d be interested in knowing if you find a scenario where the rendered results differ! Finally, compiling rustc itself is now 15%-20% faster. Each commit message in this PR goes over the details; there were some inefficiencies, and now they’ve been cleaned up. See the detailed release notes for more. Library stabilizations Seven new APIs were stabilized this release: Child::try_wait is a non-blocking form of Child::wait. HashMap::retain and HashSet::retain bring the retain API Vec has to these two hash data structures. PeekMut::pop lets you pop the top element from a BinaryHeap after you’ve already peeked at it without needing to reorder the heap a second time. TcpStream::peek, UdpSocket::peek, UdpSocket::peek_from let you peek at a stream or socket. See the detailed release notes for more. Cargo features Cargo has added support for the Pijul VCS, which is written in Rust. cargo new my-awesome-project --vcs=pijul will get you going! To supplement the --all flag, Cargo now has several new flags such as --bins, --examples, --tests, and --benches, which will let you build all programs of that type. Finally, Cargo now supports Haiku and Android! See the detailed release notes for more. Contributors to 1.18.0 Many people came together to create Rust 1.18. We couldn’t have done it without all of you. Thanks! [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
The Bugzilla Project Developers meeting.
Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.
Posted 4 months ago by Greg
I made the switch to Fido last year when they had some rather tempting cell phone plans with unlimited Spotify streaming. I left Rogers for them and I have to say I haven’t been disappointed. The cell phone service and customer support are exactly ... [More] the same, since Rogers obviously owns Fido, but my cell phone bill is 30% lower. Can’t complain about that! If any of you have been on the fence, consider that Fido also provides you a $25 credit bonus if you sign up due to word of mouth from a friend. But you need to provide a personally generated Fido referral code while signing up. So if you need me to send you a code, shoot me a message with your full name (needed to create it) at and I’ll send you one! [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
This is the sumo weekly call
Posted 4 months ago by Raegan MacDonald
Last week, I participated in the European Parliament’s Technical Roundtable regarding the draft e-Privacy Regulation currently under consideration – specifically, I joined the discussion on “cookies”. The Roundtable was hosted by lead Rapporteur on ... [More] the file, MEP Marju Lauristin (Socialists and Democrats, Estonia), and MEP Michal Boni (European People’s Party, Poland). It was designed to bring together a range of stakeholders to inform the Parliament’s consideration of what could be a major change to how Europe regulates the privacy and security of communications online, related to but with a different scope and purpose than the recently adopted General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Below the fold is a brief overview of my intervention, which describes our proposed changes for some of the key aspects of the Regulation, including how it handles “cookies”, and more generally how to deliver maximal benefits for the privacy and security of communications, with minimum unnecessary or problematic complexities for technology design and engineering. I covered the following three points: We support incentives for companies to offer privacy protective options to users. The e-Privacy Regulation must be future-proofed by ensuring technological neutrality. Browsers are not gatekeepers nor ad-blockers; we are user agents. The current legal instrument on this topic, the e-Privacy Directive, leaves much to be desired when it comes to effective privacy protections and user benefit, illustrated quite prominently by the “cookie banner” which users click through to “consent” to the use of cookies by a Web site. The e-Privacy Regulation is is an important piece of legislation – for Mozilla, for Europe, and ultimately, for the health of the global internet. We support the EU’s ambitious vision,  and we will continue working with the Parliament, the Commission, and the Council by sharing our views and experiences with investing in privacy online. We hope that the Regulation will contribute to a better communications ecosystem, one that offers meaningful control, transparency, and choice to individuals, and helps to rebuild trust online. 1 – We support incentives for companies to offer privacy protective options to users. We view one of the primary objectives of the Regulation to be catalyzing more offerings of privacy protective technologies and services for users. We strongly support this objective. This is the approach we take with Firefox: Users can browse in regular mode, which permits Web sites to place cookies, or in private browsing mode, which has our Tracking Protection technology built in. We invest in making sure that both options are desirable user experiences, and the user is free to choose which they go with – and can switch between them at will, and use both at the same time. We’d like to see more of this in the industry, and welcome the language in Article 10(1) of the draft Regulation which we believe is intended to encourage this. 2 – The e-Privacy Regulation must be future-proofed by ensuring technological neutrality. One of the principles that shaped the current e-Privacy Directive was technological neutrality. It’s critical that the Regulation similarly follow this principle, to ensure practical application and to keep it future-proof. It should therefore focus on the underlying privacy risk to users created by cross-site and cross-device tracking, rather than on specific technologies that create that risk. To achieve that, the current draft of the Regulation would benefit from two changes. First, the Parliament should revise  references to specific tracking techniques, like first and third party cookies to ensure that other forms of tracking aren’t overlooked. While blocking third party cookies may seem at first glance to be a low hanging fruit to better protect user privacy and security online — see this Firefox add-on called Lightbeam, which demonstrates the amount of first and third party sites that can “follow” you online — there are a number of different ways a user can be tracked online; via third party cookies is only an implementation of one form (albeit a common one). Device fingerprinting, for example, creates a unique, persistent identifier that undermines user consent mechanisms and that requires a regulatory solution. Similarly, Advertising identifiers are a pervasive tracking tool on mobile platforms that are currently not addressed. The Regulation should use terminology that more accurately captures the targeted behavior, and not only one possible implementation of tracking. Second, the Regulation includes a particular focus on Web browsers (such as Recitals 22-24), without proper consideration of the diversity of forms of online communications today. We aren’t suggesting that the Regulation exclude Web browsing, of course. But to focus on one particular client-side software technology risks missing other technology with significant privacy implications, such as tracking facilitated by mobile operating systems or butt services accessed via mobile apps. Keeping a principle-based approach will ensure that the Regulation doesn’t impose a specific solution that does not meaningfully deliver on transparency, choice, and control outside of the Web browsing context. 3 – Browsers are not gatekeepers nor ad-blockers; we are user agents. Building on the above, the Parliament ought to view the Web browser in a manner that reflects its place in the technology ecosystem. Web browsers are user agents facilitating the communication between internet users and Web sites. For example, Firefox offers deep customisation options, and its goal is to put the user in the driver seat. Similarly, Firefox private browsing mode includes Tracking Protection technology, which blocks certain third party trackers through a blacklist (learn more about our approach to content blocking here). Both of these are user agent features, embedded in code shipped to users and run on their local devices – neither is a service that we functionally intermediate or operate as it is used. It’s not constructive from a regulatory perspective, nor an accurate understanding of the technology, to describe Web browsers as gatekeepers in the way the Regulation does today. The post Engaging on e-Privacy at the European Parliament appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy. [Less]