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Posted 4 months ago by Denelle Dixon
As we gear up to celebrate the tenth anniversary of International Data Privacy Day on January 28, we want to highlight Mozilla’s efforts to create awareness and help protect your personal information. As champions of a healthy and safer internet, we ... [More] don’t care about your privacy just one day a year. Every day is data privacy day for us. And we don’t mean this as a gimmick. Mozilla isn’t your average tech company. We are a not-for-profit dedicated to keeping the web open and accessible to all. Privacy and safeguarding your personal data is the core of our mission. And of our products. Firefox Quantum and everything else we do from policy to advocacy or fun social media activities are rooted in that principle. To learn more about what we do and what you can do to protect your privacy here are some events and tips. Watch the Data Privacy Day 2018 Live Stream Today, Mozilla will be participating in the U.S. National Cyber Security Alliance Privacy Aware event, to talk more about how to respect privacy, safeguard data and enable trust. You can watch the event here, where I’ll give an update on my recent TEDx talk about the problem with online privacy and the importance of taking control of our online lives. Promote strong privacy policy We continue to work on policies that support privacy around the world: advocating for what India’s first data protection law should look like, helping guide the ePrivacy Regulation in the EU, and working to ensure that the U.S. government collaborates with companies to protect your data from bad actors. Browse tracking-free with Firefox Quantum’s latest release Earlier this week, we released the latest version of Firefox Quantum which includes opt-in Tracking Protection. We’ve studied Tracking Protection and found that, in addition to protecting their privacy, users actually have a better, faster experience with the web when pages load without trackers. That is why in November we upped the ante in Firefox Quantum and began offering our users the option to turn on Tracking Protection all the time. 24-7. Protect your privacy with the Data Detox Kit Mozilla is a proud partner of Tactical Tech, whose Data Detox will help you remove any toxic data build up. It’s an 8-day cleanse, and with just a small daily time commitment, you finish feeling refreshed and rejuvenated online and IRL. The detox is was an integral part of the Glass Room, an interactive exhibition that highlights people’s relationship with the Internet. Let’s protect privacy and make peanut brittle! To help bring the important issues of data security and privacy to a general audience, on Friday, January 26, we’re also celebrating Peanut Brittle Day. Just like you shouldn’t use the same amount of all the ingredients, you shouldn’t use the same password for all your sites. How do you keep track off all your different passwords? Join our team as they talk safety and security online while making Peanut Brittle for a one of a kind live stream. Happy Data Privacy Day! The post Celebrating the tenth anniversary of International Data Privacy Day appeared first on The Mozilla Blog. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
Net neutrality: the notion that all data on the Internet should be treated the same, without discrimination or differential pricing -- is at risk in...
Posted 4 months ago by Andrzej Mazur
It’s been a while since the js13kGames 2017 competition ended in September last year, but it’s worth recalling as it was the first time with a brand new category – A-Frame. Let’s see what some of the competition participants have to say about the ... [More] challenges of developing playable WebVR entries limited to just 13 kilobytes each. We had a whole lot of cool prizes for the winners, and we also guaranteed swag for all the participants – including t-shirts and special custom-built cardboards for everyone. You can check the landing page for details and see all the 28 entries from this category submitted to the competition in 2017. Competition entries The response from devs who built A-Frame games was very positive, and some of them shared tips, tricks, and lessons learned during the development of their games: Spacewrecked by Timmy Kokke Timmy submitted the Spacewrecked game where he experimented with pixel art in VR. During this year’s js13kGames competition, I tried making a roguelike VR game. I chose to create very small pixel-art graphics and textures to use in the game and created shaders to go with those. He also tells us how he overcome testing and debugging challenges. One of the hardest challenges I had was regarding testing on a DayDream device. I ended up creating a subdomain DNS entry on one of my domains pointing to my local IP. Debugging was possible using the remote tools in Chrome. I had an issue with the settings of the lenses. This was caused by A-Frame/Three.js defaulting to a polyfill. By default WebVR is disabled on Chrome on Android. I was able to turn this on in the About:Flags, but later found out it could be enabled through the OriginTrials as well. I really enjoyed the contest and learned a lot of the details of A-Frame. As you can see, the debugging part can be tricky, but it pays off in the end. Vernissage by Platane Platane decided to build Vernissage – an interactive tour around a museum. You are lost and have to find your way out… while looking at art. He used binary encoding in JavaScript to reduce the size of the assets and saved the data as file using Unit8Array, and generated an unique ambient occlusion map for the whole floor in the game by drawing each wall cell on a Canvas with a blur filter. Be sure to check it all out as Platane implemented some nice techniques there – it is split into original idea and gameplay, image processing and graphics. Shifted Dimensions by Nylki Nylki wanted to play with Shaders, and so Shifted Dimensions was born. Just a few weeks before js13kGames 2017 started, I was playing around with the excellent Book of Shaders and I knew I wanted to try using own GLSL code in an actual game or experience, which js13k seemed to be the perfect occasion for. In addition to that, it was announced that there was going to be a new category this year, making a size-constrained game with A-Frame. So I thought, why not try to combine both? Fast forward, I was making a WebVR game that made use of custom GLSL-based textures, which interacted with the tracked controllers in hopefully interesting and fun ways. Sometimes forgotten, sound is an important part of an immersive experience. Nylki learnt it late but overcame the problem with synthetic generation. However, what I didn’t anticipate in the end, how hard it was going to be to synthesize non-annoying sound let alone music without samples. So the only sound I managed to create was some tacky energy-goes-up “bwrrrRRRzRZ* [sound level increasing] and a lot of text-to-speech phrases all over the place. It’s still more than nothing though. Lost in Guam by Kenneth Banico Upon entering this competition, I felt like a small fish (baby coder) swimming with sharks (master coders). After all this built up my confidence, because I had actually placed in the top 10, but all I really wanted was a t-shirt. Placing was something that I didn’t think much of. Kenneth was tempted to participate because of the swag guaranteed for all submitted entries. Every reason is good especially when the outcome is a cool game like Lost in Guam. I submitted the game “Lost in Guam” – this was my first attempt in making a 3D game. The goal is to try and find your way out and avoid trees. Looking back at it now, the trees should have been coconut trees instead of pine trees, after all Guam is a tropical island. It doesn’t sound like much of a problem though, given it’s the very first 3D game developed by Kenneth. Lost in CYBERSPACE by Zosia and Bartek (The winner!) The winner of 2017’s A-Frame category was the game Lost in CYBERSPACE, a co-op VR game with one player wearing the headset and being the hacker, moving around in 3D world, while the other one is the navigator, can access the console and give hints for how to move past obstacles. I, together with Bartek decided to try it and build a cooperative game around a theme of Lost. I want to share with you some interesting fragments and pitfalls we encountered while developing Lost in CYBERSPACE. I hope that you’ve learnt something today and maybe even felt motivated to try building a VR game of your own. In Zosia’s blog post you can check some neat tricks, including generating a random network for the game, or creating (and decoding) unique shared codes needed to move the game forward. What now? A a way of learning, it’s important to be able to review and analyze someone else’s source code. The js13kGames competition gives you the perfect opportunity to do that – you can look at what other developers have created and learn from them. Remember that aside from the minified version within the 13 kilobyte limit, submitting the source code in a readable form is a requirement of this competition. Everyone who’s interested in diving deep into any of the submitted entries are free to do so, and there are 800 good reasons to explore, that we’ve collected since 2012 when the competition began. WebVR Medieval Challenge Are you feeling inspired by any of the games or comments above? The next js13kGames competition is still more than six months away, but if you’re in need of more challenges, then fear not – Mozilla recently launched the WebVR Medieval Fantasy Experience Challenge. We invite you to create a new game, experience, interaction, or design with the assets created from Real Time Design Challenge with Sketchfab. You’ll receive constructive feedback from a panel of qualified judges, and some really cool hardware prizes are available for the winners. Deadline is February 28th, so there’s still plenty of time to check it out! Global Game Jam In fact, if you’re participating in the Global Game Jam hackathon this weekend, here’s an idea for you! Keep in mind that you could make a combo out of your gamedev skills and create a GGJ entry and participate in the Medieval Challenge at the same time. One entry for two competitions – how cool is that? [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Mozilla
Technology is continually providing us with new ways to create and publish stories. For these stories to achieve their full impact, it requires that the tools to deploy them become accessible and easy to use. That’s one of the reasons why Mozilla has ... [More] worked to develop A-Frame, a framework that makes it easy for anyone to build virtual reality experiences for the web. Emblematic Group, founded by virtual reality pioneer Nonny de la Peña, is committed to using emerging technologies to tell important and overlooked stories, creating immersive experiences that address impactful social issues. Their most recent breakthrough project, Mother Nature, uses A-Frame, democratizing the process and allowing users to tell their own stories in WebVR. Mother Nature is a traveling installation that invites people to rebuke claims that women are underrepresented in tech leadership and engineering roles due to ‘clear biological causes’ and seeks to give female engineers, leaders, technologists and creators a platform and voice. While working on this project, the Emblematic team was able to collaborate with Mozilla to build a new platform that utilizes A-frame to tell stories easily and quickly. “What used to take us weeks, now only takes us minutes,” explained de la Peña, as she shared how A-Frame has changed the way she and her team create and deliver content. As de la Peña elaborated, most journalism organizations don’t have the money to hire all the software developers needed to create VR experiences. A-Frame allows these organizations to bring their vision to life in a way that is easier, faster, and cheaper. It cuts out lengthy post-production work that can take weeks and typically requires highly sophisticated computer programming. This development is an important step in bringing new voices into virtual reality. Looking forward, Emblematic aims to create REACH, an open-source toolkit for creating and sharing stories that use high-resolution photograms as backgrounds. With an initial focus on journalism funded by a grant from the Knight Foundation, Emblematic is working with the Online News Association to source and capture newsworthy locations and to support digital journalists eager to benefit from the unique capabilities of this new platform. From places like the Tijuana border to Greenland to the Supreme Court, storytellers will be able to bring their own pressing stories straight into the browser for high fidelity virtual reality in a way that previously was too costly for most newsrooms. The eventual goal is for any user with a mobile phone to be able to create and publish experiences that lets users walk around inside the story. Learn more about Nonny de la Pena and follow the Emblematic Group by visiting their website. Learn more about how to get started with A-Frame by visiting the official website.   The post Mozilla Empowers Journalists with the Power of A-Frame appeared first on The Mozilla Blog. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Mozilla
Technology is continually providing us with new ways to create and publish stories. For these stories to achieve their full impact, it requires that the tools to deploy them become accessible and easy to use. That’s one of the reasons why Mozilla has ... [More] worked to develop A-Frame, a framework that makes it easy for anyone to build virtual reality experiences for the web. Emblematic Group, founded by virtual reality pioneer Nonny de la Peña, is committed to using emerging technologies to tell important and overlooked stories, creating immersive experiences  that address impactful social issues. Their most recent breakthrough project, Mother Nature,  uses A-Frame, democratizing the process and allowing users to tell their own stories in WebVR. Mother Nature is a traveling installation that invites people to rebuke claims that women are underrepresented in tech leadership and engineering roles due to ‘clear biological causes’ and seeks to give female engineers, leaders, technologists and creators a platform and voice. While working on this project, the Emblematic team was able to collaborate with Mozilla to build a new platform that utilizes A-frame to tell stories easily and quickly.     “What used to take us weeks, now only takes us minutes,” explained de la Peña, as she shared how A-Frame has changed the way she and her team create and deliver content. As de la Peña elaborated, most journalism organizations don’t have the money to hire all the software developers needed to create VR experiences. A-Frame allows these organizations to bring their vision to life in a way that is easier, faster, and cheaper. It cuts out lengthy post production work that can take weeks and typically requires highly sophisticated computer programming. This development is an important step in bringing new voices into virtual reality. Looking forward, Emblematic aims to create REACH, an open-source toolkit for creating and sharing stories that use high resolution photograms as backgrounds. With an initial focus on journalism funded by a grant from the Knight Foundation, Emblematic is working with the Online News Association to source and capture newsworthy locations and to support digital journalists eager to benefit from the unique capabilities of this new platform. From places like the Tijuana border to Greenland to the Supreme Court, storytellers will be able to bring their own pressing stories straight into the browser for high fidelity virtual reality in a way that previously was too costly for most newsrooms.  The eventual goal is for any user with a mobile phone to be able to create and publish experiences that lets users walk around inside the story. Learn more about Nonny de la Pena and follow the Emblematic Group by visiting their website. Learn more about how to get started with A-Frame by visiting the official website.   The post Mozilla Empowers Journalists with the Power of A-Frame appeared first on The Mozilla Blog. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago by Air Mozilla
This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.
Posted 4 months ago by Sarah Oh
Introducing the Open Research Collective on Information PollutionMisinformation online is a relatively new problem for platforms, researchers, and communities. Understanding the problem, and staying abreast of the latest insights from social science ... [More] and computer science research about how misinformation is created, spreads online, and affects users are necessary steps towards designing and launching impactful projects.To help surface actionable insights for researchers and communities working on information-pollution challenges, the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative (MITI) is supporting a community repository of recently published articles from thoughtful researchers across disciplines, spanning from communications to political science to human-computer interaction.Our hope is that this resource will reinforce existing ideas, or tether new proposals to an existing body of research and insights.The Mozilla Foundation will also host a remote study group to discuss and analyze cutting-edge research on topics related to information pollution. Thinkers and doers everywhere are welcome to participate. The topics will include: The effects of information pollution on users. Who’s most vulnerable? Conditions for building trust online. Are online fact checks and counter-messages working? Echo chambers and internet health. How can content creators reach polarized audiences online (without magnifying polarization themselves)? New research methods for the misinformation community Register to participate in upcoming study group conversations here. Have ideas for other topics? Interested in getting involved? Please contact saraho@mozillafoundation.org.MITI is committed to supporting the open-source coders, open-access researchers, and information activists who are taking up the charge to study information pollution trends, and study new education and tool-based interventions that will help keep the internet open and healthy.Introducing the Open Research Collective on Information Pollution was originally published in Mozilla Open Innovation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
Amazon Fire TV users! Here at Mozilla, we believe you should have the ability to watch what you want or view the web how you want. Firefox for Fire TV, … Read more The post Get Firefox on your Amazon Fire TV, now with Turbo Mode appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.
Posted 4 months ago
Amazon Fire TV users! Here at Mozilla, we believe you should have the ability to watch what you want or view the web how you want. Firefox for Fire TV, … Read more The post Get Firefox on your Amazon Fire TV, now with Turbo Mode appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.
Posted 4 months ago by dylanwh
dylanwh: release tag the following changes have been pushed to bugzilla.mozilla.org: [1429600] Update Revision.pm type checking to treat bug id as a simple string or undefined [1426414] Send preload headers for webfonts [1431135] add bug status css ... [More] class to markup [1430495] Make loading of Requests dropdown faster [1429785] In-page back navigation broken [1429688] focus Search Bugs box by default… View On WordPress [Less]