68
I Use This!
High Activity

News

Analyzed 25 days ago. based on code collected 3 months ago.
Posted 4 days ago by humdinger
HaikuPorter is a python tool that takes a so-called recipe that describes the dependencies of a software and how to download, build and package it. The HaikuPorts Wiki has all the info to get started writing recipes. But it gets into too much detail ... [More] if all you want is use HaikuPorter to build stuff with existing working recipes. Here’s a quick step-by-step guide how to do that. 1. Getting HaikuPorter and the Recipes Get the HaikuPorter tool and the haikuports tree with all the recipes: git clone https://github.com/haikuports/haikuporter.git git clone https://github.com/haikuports/haikuports.git That'll create two directories: "haikuporter" with the python tool and "haikuports" with all the recipes categorized in sub-folders. 2. Setting up HaikuPorter Put HaikuPorter into the system's “Path”, so it can be invoked like any other command: cd haikuporter ln -s haikuporter ~/config/non-packaged/bin/ Copy and edit the haikuports configuration file: cp haikuports-sample.conf ~/config/settings/haikuports.conf lpe ~/config/settings/haikuports.conf In the haikuports.conf file you have to edit/un-comment the lines: TREE_PATH - where you cloned the haikuports tree, e.g. "/boot/home/haikuports" PACKAGER - your name and email address, e.g. "Humdinger TARGET_ARCHITECTURE=”x86_gcc2” SECONDARY_TARGET_ARCHITECTURE=”x86” This is for running the official 32bit Haiku (gcc2hybrid), where the older gcc2 compiler is the default to maintain BeOS compatibility and "x86" is a modern compiler (currently gcc5.4) for applications that won't build with the ancient gcc2. 3. Using HaikuPorter Now you can start using HaikuPorter. You get all its options with "haikuporter --help". In the haikuports tree, you search the recipe of the software you’d like to build. You can also use, e.g. "haikuporter -o artpaint" to have haikuporter look for a specific recipe, here for “ArtPaint”. To build ArtPaint, you type: haikuporter -S -j4 --get-dependencies --no-source-packages artpaint -S : enforce "strict policy" to create standard compliant HPKGs. -j4 : use 4 cores when building to save time. --get-dependencies : automatically download all packages needed for building that aren’t already installed. --no-source-packages : don’t create a package with the source code. artpaint : build the latest recipe for "ArtPaint". You find successfully built packages in the folder "haikuports/packages". 4. Tips & Tricks To save yourself much typing, you can add this line to the file ~/config/settings/profile (a text file that you have to create if it doesn’t exist already): alias hp='haikuporter -S -j4 --get-dependencies --no-source-packages' Now you can build with a simple "hp artpaint" and have those standard parameters added automatically. Some software can’t be built with gcc2 and needs the modern compiler. You can see that in the recipes that declare: ARCHITECTURES="!x86_gcc2 x86 x86_64" SECONDARY_ARCHITECTURES="x86" The "!" says the package can't be built for that architecture. A "?" shows that it hasn't been tested for it. In such a case, haikuporter will complain that "it is broken on the target architecture". You instruct haikuporter to build with the secondary architecture by appending a "_x86" to the recipe name, e.g. " bepdf_x86". Sometimes you find recipes for different versions of a software. HaikuPorter builds the latest by default. If you'd like a specific version, you can append the version number found in the recipe's filename, e.g. "bepdf_x86-2.0.0" to build v2.0.0 of BePDF for the secondary architecture (gcc5.4 currently). If something goes wrong and you want a fresh start, open the folder of the recipe you try to build and delete all folders starting with "work-". Also delete the "download" folder if you suspect a corrupted source archive. Do a "haikuporter artpaint -c" for ArtPaint as example. In some weird cases you may have to also delete the folders "haikuports/packages" and "haikuports/repositories", which will be time-consumingly recreated with the next build. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago by humdinger
HaikuPorter is a python tool that takes a so-called recipe that describes the dependencies of a software and how to download, build and package it. The HaikuPorts Wiki has all the info to get started writing recipes. But it gets into too much detail ... [More] if all you want is use HaikuPorter to build stuff with existing working recipes. Here’s a quick step-by-step guide how to do that. 1. Getting HaikuPorter and the Recipes Get the HaikuPorter tool and the haikuports tree with all the recipes: git clone https://github.com/haikuports/haikuporter.git git clone https://github.com/haikuports/haikuports.git That'll create two directories: "haikuporter" with the python tool and "haikuports" with all the recipes categorized in sub-folders. 2. Setting up HaikuPorter Put HaikuPorter into the system's “Path”, so it can be invoked like any other command: cd haikuporter ln -s haikuporter ~/config/non-packaged/bin/ Copy and edit the haikuports configuration file: cp haikuports-sample.conf ~/config/settings/haikuports.conf lpe ~/config/settings/haikuports.conf In the haikuports.conf file you have to edit/un-comment the lines: TREE_PATH - where you cloned the haikuports tree, e.g. "/boot/home/haikuports" PACKAGER - your name and email address, e.g. "Humdinger " TARGET_ARCHITECTURE="x86_gcc2" SECONDARY_TARGET_ARCHITECTURE="x86" This is for running the official 32bit Haiku (gcc2hybrid), where the older gcc2 compiler is the default to maintain BeOS compatibility and "x86" is a modern compiler (currently gcc5.4) for applications that won't build with the ancient gcc2. 3. Using HaikuPorter Now you can start using HaikuPorter. You get all its options with "haikuporter --help". In the haikuports tree, you search the recipe of the software you’d like to build. You can also use, e.g. "haikuporter -o artpaint" to have haikuporter look for a specific recipe, here for “ArtPaint”. To build ArtPaint, you type: haikuporter -S -j4 --get-dependencies --no-source-packages artpaint -S : enforce "strict policy" to create standard compliant HPKGs. -j4 : use 4 cores when building to save time. --get-dependencies : automatically download all packages needed for building that aren’t already installed. --no-source-packages : don’t create a package with the source code. artpaint : build the latest recipe for "ArtPaint". You find successfully built packages in the folder "haikuports/packages". 4. Keeping uptodate The haikuports tree receives almost daily changes with new, updated and fixed recipes. To stay abreast with those changes, you should regularly update. This is very easy with "haikuporter --get". Likewise, haikuporter itself gets updated from time to time. At the latest if recipes start to fail building, you should update. This, too, is quite easy; you enter the directory "haikuporter" that you have cloned in the 1st step and use git to pull in all changes: cd haikuporter git pull 5. Tips & Tricks To save yourself much typing, you can add this line to the file ~/config/settings/profile (a text file that you have to create if it doesn’t exist already): alias hp='haikuporter -S -j4 --get-dependencies --no-source-packages' Now you can build with a simple "hp artpaint" and have those standard parameters added automatically. Some software can’t be built with gcc2 and needs the modern compiler. You can see that in the recipes that declare: ARCHITECTURES="!x86_gcc2 x86 x86_64" SECONDARY_ARCHITECTURES="x86" The "!" says the package can't be built for that architecture. A "?" shows that it hasn't been tested for it. In such a case, haikuporter will complain that "it is broken on the target architecture". You instruct haikuporter to build with the secondary architecture by appending a "_x86" to the recipe name, e.g. " bepdf_x86". Sometimes you find recipes for different versions of a software. HaikuPorter builds the latest by default. If you'd like a specific version, you can append the version number found in the recipe's filename, e.g. "bepdf_x86-2.0.0" to build v2.0.0 of BePDF for the secondary architecture (gcc5.4 currently). If something goes wrong and you want a fresh start, open the folder of the recipe you try to build and delete all folders starting with "work-". Also delete the "download" folder if you suspect a corrupted source archive. Do a "haikuporter artpaint -c" for ArtPaint as example. In some weird cases you may have to also delete the folders "haikuports/packages" and "haikuports/repositories", which will be time-consumingly recreated with the next build. [Less]
Posted 17 days ago by mmu_man
So, I just arrived from Brussels back home. One more FOSDEM done. As always it was action-packed, and I couldn’t clone myself enough times to see everything. The fact that we had the booth and that 3 out of the 4 talks I proposed were accepted ... [More] probably didn’t help. Luckily this time we were three to handle the half-booth, as both Olivier and Adrien made it with me, because yes, we shared the table with ReactOS this time, to increase the chances of being picked up. The trip went without trouble, except I only slept like two hours and had to wake up at 5am, and I was still recovering from a flu, but you know, devotion. ;-) I arrived on Friday, and quickly found the hotel, took lunch and a well needed nap. I woke up too late to attend any of the outside events I was aware of, so can’t tell much about those. I also finished my slides, although they were already quite done in the train. On Saturday we set up the booth with Olivier, after he spent 30 minutes finding a place to park the car, and we started chatting with our two ReactOS dev neighbours. Adrien soon joined us from Toulouse, so the team was complete. We pondered about printing a banner saying “We are NOT GNU/Linux distros” but we weren’t allowed to tape anything on the wall. Someone did a short audio interview of all the stands, including ours. We also had quite many people passing by, as we were located just next to the infodesk in the K building, where all the GNU/Linux distros are, so the place was crowded. Some people did ask us for the toilets though. :D In the evening all five went to a Belgo-greek restaurant to discuss the projects further more. On Sunday we woke up earlier as we had to check out of the hotel, and I had my three talks starting at 10:45. At least it was easier to park the car this time. I went to see the first talk of the Decentralized Internet devroom by Tristan Nitot (ex-Mozilla, now at Cozy), but then I went to get accustomed to the Desktop devroom. One of the talks I wanted to see there was cancelled, it was about alternative graphics servers on Linux, and I wanted to thank them for helping make GNU/Linux software more portable to Haiku by removing X11 dependencies… I started by talking about retro desktops in the Desktop devroom, and the room was almost full. Then I talked about Haiku, and I believe most people stayed. I had some interesting questions for both talks, but then I had to rush to another building for the third one. The Python devroom was in an amphitheater, and I had even more people watching me talking about Weboob, I’m not used to it… The videos for the talks are starting to become available, the talk pages should link them automatically when they are. Then I took some much needed lunch. I checked the foodtrucks but they were quite busy, so I went for a sandwich at the caferaria. On my way out I saw Amaelle Guiton, a french journalist, on her first FOSDEM. She wrote a nice article about it in French (guess who’s on the photo). At FOSDEM, even lunch is an opportunity to discuss with people you met at other conferences. It’s also an occasion to advertise useful FLOSS projects, like OpenFoodFacts, an open crowdsourced database of food informations (ingredients, allergens, nutrition tables…). I also tried to go back to the Decentralized Internet devroom but it was full. Apparently it was full the hole day, so the topic got attention. I also wanted to meet with people organizing the next RMLL/LSM (Libre Software Meeting) in Saint Etienne, but it seems we missed each other. I also passed by other booths, and said hello to Stephanie, Josh and Jeremy from the Google OpenSource team (yeah, you know, GCI and GSoC). Besides my own blue beret from the 2008 RMLL, I saw other people wearing berets, and some people wore even stranger hats, specially the VLC folks with their cone-heads… I passed by more booths in other buildings. There were some funky things, like a system to detect failed street lights when passing under with a car from Automotive Grade Linux, and BBC’s micro:bit, a new microcontroller board to help kids learn coding and electronics. Back to our booth for some more discussions about Haiku, about applications, and driver support… Then it was already time to tear down the tables, and I joined the ReactOS devs in the shuttle to the train station, although mine was a bit later. I wasn’t sure I would be able to find someone to drive me from the TGV station, because, well, “Valence”-TGV is actually 15km away from the town called Valence, it’s just in the middle of nowhere, and of course there aren’t any shuttles after 11pm. But after begging some friends on twitter I finally found a lift. I wish I was in a better shape so I could have seen more people and more talks, but it was still enjoyable to talk to many folks at the booth either remembering BeOS fondly or thinking about testing Haiku again after some years to see how the package management works. And now we need to prepare for the JDLL in April, then the RMLL/LSM (Libre Software Meeting) this summer. [Less]
Posted 18 days ago by waddlesplash
Yesterday, The Lunduke Hour, hosted by Bryan Lunduke (perhaps most famous for his “Linux Sucks” presentations), had me on as a guest to talk about the state of Haiku and where we go from here: Bryan’s been a longtime fan of Haiku (some of the ... [More] old-timers might remember when he reviewed R1a3 on the Linux Action Show…), and it was a lot of fun to chat with him for an hour about what’s been going on over the past few years, and where things are headed. [Less]
Posted 21 days ago by deepanshu
What happens when you combine 337 students, 20+ mentors, and an endless volley of tasks? During the time from November 2016 to January 2017, 368 Haiku tasks were successfully completed. The seventh year of Google’s Code-In, and the seventh for Haiku ... [More] as a mentoring organization was a grand success. Students from all around the world aged 13-17 worked with the project mentors on improving Haiku during the 7 weeks of the contest. They coded applications, designed artwork, tested software, and wrote recipes, and more than anything else, had fun. Out of the 10 students who completed the maximum number of tasks, finalists and grand prize winners were picked collectively by the diligent team of Haiku’s 20+ mentors. Haiku’s Grand Prize Winners Raefaldhi Amartya Junior from Indonesia Vanisha Kesswani from India Haiku’s Finalists Tudor Nazarie Stephanie Fu Dmytro Shynkevych Rest of Haiku’s top ten finishers Tejpunj Raju Dacian Florentin Florea Punsith Ratnayake Owen Winston Durand Congratulations finalists! Safe travels, grand winners! We are thankful for your precious contributions and will be delighted see you continue to contribute even after the program. This year Jessica Hamilton will make the trip to meet the winners as they both picked her as the mentor they would like to meet. Haiku had an impressive growth in the number of students: To list some of the students’ achievements: A map application (github.com/raefaldhia/maps), and a music manager for Haiku were coded. Over 50 recipes were written for HaikuPorts. Around 15+ recipes were de-linted. A dozen QA test plans were documented. Icons for Becasso, Hexvexed, Freeciv, Rocks ‘n’ Diamonds, and 2048 were created, as well as more icons to be used in the Weather application. WhereMyMouse and CaptialBe were updated to use the Layout Management. Addition of missing email provider information. Addition of Pthreads barriers implementation to Haiku. Articles converted to markdown for the new Haiku website. Video tutorials were prepared. Presenting Haiku at their schools or other local groups. Supplying icons, screenshots, and categories for packages in HaikuDepot. and much more! I hope that despite probably being the best of their age in their field, the winning students will stay humble, and hunger for new knowledge. So congratulations and thanks to all our hardworking students and their mentors, and especially Scott McCreary who once again shouldered the responsibility of administrating Haiku’s GCI participation. [Less]
Posted 21 days ago by deepanshu
What happens when you combine 337 students, 20+ mentors, and an endless volley of tasks? During the time from November 2016 to January 2017, 368 Haiku tasks were successfully completed. The seventh year of Google’s Code-In, and the seventh for Haiku ... [More] as a mentoring organization was a grand success. Students from all around the world aged 13-17 worked with the project mentors on improving Haiku during the 7 weeks of the contest. They coded applications, designed artwork, tested software, and wrote recipes, and more than anything else, had fun. Out of the 10 students who completed the maximum number of tasks, finalists and grand prize winners were picked collectively by the diligent team of Haiku’s 20+ mentors. Haiku’s Grand Prize Winners Raefaldhi Amartya Junior from Indonesia Vanisha Kesswani from India Haiku’s Finalists Tudor Nazarie Stephanie Fu Dmytro Shynkevych Rest of Haiku’s top ten finishers Tejpunj Raju Dacian Florentin Florea Punsith Ratnayake Owen Winston Durand Congratulations finalists! Safe travels, grand winners! We are thankful for your precious contributions and will be delighted see you continue to contribute even after the program. This year Jessica Hamilton will make the trip to meet the winners as they both picked her as the mentor they would like to meet. Haiku had an impressive growth in the number of students: To list some of the students’ achievements: A map application, and a music manager for Haiku were coded. Over 50 recipes were written for HaikuPorts. Around 15+ recipes were de-linted. A dozen QA test plans were documented. Icons for Becasso, Hexvexed, Freeciv, Rocks ‘n’ Diamonds, and 2048 were created, as well as more icons to be used in the Weather application. WhereMyMouse and CapitalBe were updated to use the Layout Management. Addition of missing email provider information. Addition of Pthreads barriers implementation to Haiku. Articles converted to markdown for the new Haiku website. Video tutorials were prepared. Presenting Haiku at their schools or other local groups. Supplying icons, screenshots, and categories for packages in HaikuDepot. and much more! I hope that despite probably being the best of their age in their field, the winning students will stay humble, and hunger for new knowledge. So congratulations and thanks to all our hardworking students and their mentors, and especially Scott McCreary who once again shouldered the responsibility of administrating Haiku’s GCI participation. [Less]
Posted 24 days ago by pulkomandy
Hello world! Let’s see how 2017 goes in Haiku. This report covers hrev50830-hrev50928 (almost 100 or about 3 pushes per day). Drivers and hardware support UEFI support The work on UEFI continues and compatibility improves to reach more and more ... [More] machines. Note that it is not yet integrated in the default build, you have to use jessicah’s build to boot with UEFI. After installing, you can update as usual, however. Video modes Haiku now knows about 1360x768 and allows to use it when your display declares support for it. This mode is used by some “HD ready” TVs as a compromise between 720p and 1080p. Network The atheros813x driver is now up to date with FreeBSD 11. It is the first driver to be made up to date, and did not require too much changes. We hope to see more people attempt to port drivers from FreeBSD, it shouldn’t be too hard. Package management Tools and infrastructure A new “Repositories” preference panel is available. It allows you to more easily manage your sources of software. No need to revert to the command line to add (or remove) repositories. Package updates Package updates continue as haikuports slowly gets things in shape for beta1. Several packages were updated to fix a broken dependency to libpng. User interface Some polishing and fixing graphics glitches in various places, in particular to avoid text in different languages being truncated in BTabView. Work in progress on cleaning up the print dialogs and making them more coherent accross different apps. The download of application icons in HaikuDepot was reworked to be much faster, using a single archive with all the icons. System internals Axeld resumed work on BFS, adding several sanity and safety checks to make it less susceptible to trigger the kernel debugger. Jessicah fixed issues related to handling of UTF-32 and characters outside the unicode BMP. There was some mixup between UTF-16 and UTF-32 in our sources, leading to various problems including broken display of file names, crashes in gawk, and probably several other problems. Several small patches to fix style issues, memory leaks in rarely triggered error cases, and similar minor issues. Tracker will not crash if you copy a special file (a device or a FIFO, for example). A better implementation of scrypt was added for more secure password storage. Media kit Barrett continues his work on the new BMediaClient API. The volume control replicant now uses media server notifications instead of polling. This will avoid several problems where it would freeze (and the deskbar would freeze with it), and also help with power saving (one less reason to wake up the CPU). Web browser and HTTP One case of deadlock, and the remaining problem with HTTP redirects, were both fixed. The web browser will no longer show the content of HTTP redirect pages, and should work much better. Miscellaneous information New contributors A warm welcome to people who submitted patches this month: Kacper Kasper, Gabriel Maia, Andrew Aldridge, Murai Takashi, Sean Healy, Brian Hill, and Tsimblist. We hope to see more from you! Google Summer of Code Haiku is applying to the Google Summer of Code. We were not selected the last two years, but we hope to be back this year with some new project ideas and a renewed mentor team. Web services Now that the website migration is mostly done, waddlesplash is working on improving our Pootle (user interface translation) and user guide translation online tools. Both were largely unmaintained for the past few years, and it is great news that someone is taking care of them again. Are we released yet? While the work on beta1 continues, we are not quite ready for a release yet. There is an accumulation of little problems that need to be solved one at a time. First of all, we need to set up the “build master”, a server that will control remote compilation of software packages. We want to set this up before the release, because the release will have a package repository separate from the one used for the master branch. Maintaining a single repository is a lot of work for Haiku developers, maintaining 2 in the current situation would use all the developer time. So, this system should bring some automation and make it easier to manage the package repositories. In order to deploy this, we need a server with good internet access. While I made a prototype run on my own server, it is not meant for production use (I need my ADSL line and home-server for some other things). The plan is to set the master up on Haiku’s servers. However, we need to make some space for it there. And for this, we have to wait on the migration of the website, which is complete, but the blog post comments from the old web site were not migrated yet. Once that is done, we can recycle the virtual machine formerly used for the website to run the package builder. Another problem is that the machines doing the build are often hitting a kernel panic in BFS code. It tends to show up under workoads that create and delete lots of files, such as running a configure script. This is quite common in the usage pattern of the build bots, of course, and at least one of them will crash and stop building packages every few hours. Ideally we would fix this issue, but failing that, we will configure the bots to reboot automatically when such a crash happens, instead of waiting in the kernel debugger. On the haikuports side, things are back to the usual quietness and people can focus on getting things ready for the release. This involves analyzing the output of the build bots, looking into why some builds fails, and fixing the recipes until we get everything building. With these 3 issues fixed, we will be much closer to the release with a sustainable way to keep the repositories up to date. We can then move on to creating the branch on Haiiku side and making it use the generated package repository. [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago by moochris
So you’ve installed Haiku from a recently nightly (or sometime soon, the R1 beta) and you’re launching applications from the Deskbar menu (the blue ‘leaf’ menu). Perfect, but there are a few more options to investigate if you want to quickly launch ... [More] your favourite programs. The first option is the simplest. In the Deskbar menu, just click on the ‘Applications’ submenu (or any of the others) to open a tracker window with shortcuts. Drag an icon with the right mouse button to the desktop and select ‘Create link here’ from the context menu. Hey presto, a shortcut icon on your desktop. This does require you to double-click the icon and the desktop can end up a bit messy this way :) Second option - use LaunchBox. LaunchBox can be found in ‘Desktop applets’ in the Deskbar menu and you can make it start at boot by right-clicking on its icon and ‘Create link’ to /home/config/settings/boot/launch. You can add buttons (or clear existing ones) using the context menu and simply drag and drop the program’s icon to the empty button to create a launcher. It’s quite customisable and you can also define multiple launch ‘pads’. Another option is LnLauncher, available in the repositories (through HaikuDepot or using pkgman on the command line). This is a very neat launcher, with some smart features. Initially, when you first run LnLauncher, a little yellow handle is stuck to the edge of the desktop. You can drag and drop program icons onto the handle to add them to the panel, reordering by dragging the icon within the panel whilst holding down the right mouse button. Similarly, you can move the panel by dragging it around the screen edge with the right mouse button. You can change the colour of the panel’s handle by dragging your desired colour from a colour picker, such as ‘Colors’ (available in the repository), onto the handle. Finally, you can always take a different approach and use QuickLaunch (again, available in the repository). With this tool, you simply start typing and you are presented with matching program names in a list. Hit enter to open the first result, or use the cursor keys to first select another. Simple and very handy, expecially if you use the ‘Shortcuts’ preferences to assign QuickLaunch to open on a key combination. There are other options available, like ‘DockBert’ in the repository and probably more that I don’t know about! Please feel free to point these out in the comments. [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago by waddlesplash
Hello, world! If you’re reading this message, that means you’re looking at the new Haiku website. This has been in the works for a long time, but at last it’s finally here. Gone are the days of the Drupal content management system, and in its place ... [More] is a static site, generated by Hugo from a GitHub repository and served from a global content delivery network, making for much faster page load times and a much easier way for developers and contributors alike to create and edit content. Most of the other changes to the site are similarly under-the-hood, but one that you might notice would be the switch to Bootstrap as the basis for page layouts. This means that the site will adapt to just about any screen size, including small phone screens. (Try it out by resizing your browser window!) If you spot any issues (missing content, broken page layouts, etc.) please open a ticket or reply in this thread. I’ve got plenty of time over the next few days to fix things, so please do say something if you see something incorrect. The only missing thing presently are blog/news comments, which Alex (kallisti5) is working to get up and running ASAP. We’ll keep you posted. [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago by waddlesplash
Hello, world! If you’re reading this message, that means you’re looking at the new Haiku website. This has been in the works for a long time, but at last it’s finally here. Gone are the days of the Drupal content management system, and in its ... [More] place is a static site, generated by Hugo from a GitHub repository and served from a global content delivery network, making for much faster page load times and a much easier way for developers and contributors alike to create and edit content. Most of the other changes to the site are similarly under-the-hood, but one that you might notice would be the switch to Bootstrap as the basis for page layouts. This means that the site will adapt to just about any screen size, including small phone screens. (Try it out by resizing your browser window!) If you spot any issues (missing content, broken page layouts, etc.) please open a ticket or reply in this thread. I’ve got plenty of time over the next few days to fix things, so please do say something if you see something incorrect. The only missing thing presently are blog/news comments, which Alex (kallisti5) is working to get up and running ASAP. We’ll keep you posted. [Less]