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Analyzed 9 months ago. based on code collected 9 months ago.
Posted 23 days ago
My colleague Rohit Dhamija made a handy app (and successfully demoed it at NetBeans Day India a week ago) for those who don't know where they are, in the world. Just open the app and click "Locate Me!" and the app will find you and show you exactly ... [More] where you are, including a nice animation as you are zoomed in from a world map right down to the exact spot where you're found, with this result, in my case, in Istanbul: The view is as follows: And the viewModel:  define(['ojs/ojcore', 'knockout', 'jquery'], function (oj, ko, $, app) { function DashboardViewModel() { var self = this; var latitude = 12.9418673; var longitude = 77.6886684; function onLocationSuccess(location) { console.log(location); latitude = location.latLng.lat; longitude = location.latLng.lng; console.log(latitude); console.log(longitude); } function onLocationError(error_msg) { alert(error_msg); } function onMapReady(map) { console.log("onMapReady"); var option = { enableHighAccuracy: true // Force GPS }; map.getMyLocation(option, onLocationSuccess, onLocationError); } function onDeviceReady() { console.log("ondeviceready"); var map = plugin.google.maps.Map.getMap(map_canvas); map.addEventListener(plugin.google.maps.event.MAP_READY, onMapReady); } self.buttonClick = function (data, event) { var map = plugin.google.maps.Map.getMap(map_canvas); map.addEventListener(plugin.google.maps.event.MAP_READY, locateMe); }; function locateMe(map) { console.log("map is ready."); var LOCATION = {"lat": latitude, "lng": longitude}; // Move to the position with animation map.animateCamera({ 'target': LOCATION, 'zoom': 17, 'tilt': 60, 'bearing': 140, 'duration': 9000 }, function () { console.log("animation is done"); // Add a maker map.addMarker({ position: {lat: latitude, lng: longitude}, title: "You are here!", snippet: "("+latitude + "/" + longitude+")", animation: plugin.google.maps.Animation.BOUNCE }, function (marker) { console.log("adding marker"); // Show the info window marker.showInfoWindow(); // Catch the click event marker.on(plugin.google.maps.event.INFO_CLICK, function () { }); }); }); } self.handleAttached = function (info) { document.addEventListener('deviceready', onDeviceReady); }; self.handleDetached = function (info) { document.removeEventListener('deviceready', onDeviceReady); }; } return new DashboardViewModel(); } ); You need to include "cordova-plugin-googlemaps" to provide the Google Maps functionality implemented above: https://github.com/mapsplugin/cordova-plugin-googlemaps [Less]
Posted 25 days ago
When you're running a Cordova build, at some point an attempt may be made to download a whole Gradle ZIP file, which could take a while or could be problematic when you're doing your build offline. Here's advice that can help: ... [More] http://stackoverflow.com/questions/29874564/ionic-build-android-error-when-download-gradle The relevant file is this one, below, "GradleBuilder.js":  In there, on line 190 or so, you'll find this: var distributionUrl = process.env['CORDOVA_ANDROID_GRADLE_DISTRIBUTION_URL'] || 'https\\://services.gradle.org/distributions/gradle-2.14.1-all.zip';  Change that to the following: var distributionUrl = '../gradle-2.14.1-all.zip'; ...and put the ZIP file in the following location: hybrid\platforms\android\gradle\gradle-2.14.1-all.zip Now, your local ZIP file will be used, and no attempt will be made to download it during the Cordova build.  [Less]
Posted 26 days ago
Alexius Diakogiannis Lead Architect at UniSystems talks about SpringBoot made Easy with Netbeans hosted at Unisystems on Friday 21 April. Unfortunately the video is of poor quality. Source code can be found here https://github.com/NetBeansDay/042117-Athens
Posted 27 days ago
I realized again, during the recent NetBeans Days in Athens, London, and Bangalore, that everyone appreciates quick NetBeans tips. In London, Mark and Zain provided those tips, in Athens it was Bethan and Georgia, while in Bangalore Aatul and Tushar ... [More] did the honors. And, in each of those cases, the result was great and useful. So, I'm starting a new YouTube series on that topic, hopefully one a week, and to make it as simple and doable as possible am constraining it to literally two minutes, focused on one very specific and focused tip, which means that it takes about 15 minutes in total to produce, so I really have no excuse. Drum roll... two minute NetBeans tips, part 1: The above tip comes from the NetBeans Day London session by Zain and Mark, supplemented by some specifics whispered in my ear by Vladimir, who was sitting next to me during the session.  Direct link to the above: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOuB7CsUaG0 [Less]
Posted 29 days ago
NetBeans Day India was held today in Bangalore, hosted by BlueJeans. Not only did BlueJeans give us a location, but food and drinks as well, which was great! The program was announced here, with thanks to Vaibhav Choudhary, for organizing the event: ... [More] https://www.meetup.com/BangaloreOpenJUG/events/238630862/ Attendance was good, the room was mostly full, which was especially great since it is a long weekend, with Monday being a public holiday. Sessions focused on Java as well as JavaScript, frontend and backend, all via NetBeans IDE. Below, you see Gaurav Gupta, from Payara, the developer behind the Jeddict project, a code generator for Java EE as well as Angular, which he presented with demos in NetBeans IDE. Other sessions included a focus on enterprise JavaScript, via Oracle JET, hybrid mobile development, and Node.js, presented by myself and my local colleagues Rohit Dhamija and Abhinav Shroff.  The move of NetBeans to Apache was a big theme of the event, with in my opinion this being the Tweet of the day, including a nice pic of Ivar Grimstad, from the JCP Executive Committee, who did a session on MVC 1.0 with NetBeans IDE: A definite highlight was the presence of Sharad Medhavi, Oracle Senior Director, seen next to me below, who announced that Oracle is actively building a team of Apache NetBeans developers at the local Oracle office. Two of those to join Sharad's local NetBeans team have already been hired, and were present too, Reema Taneja and Arunava Sinha. Looking forward to that team getting bigger, some of the attendees indicated an interest in this. Just think, Oracle will be paying developers fulltime to commit code to Apache NetBeans.  Another highlight was the presence of four NetBeans Dream Team members: Aatul Palandurkar, Tushar Joshi, Ivar Grimstad, and Gaurav Gupta, here eating lunch together below: It was a great event, many thanks to everybody involved, and hope it was enjoyable and informative for everyone who attended!  [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago
I'm at Code Europe in Krakow, Poland and met Don Wibier from DevExpress, with the developer site at js.devexpress.com. Just like me, he runs around to promote enterprise JavaScript technologies and just like Oracle JET, DevExpress is focused on the ... [More] enterprise, specifically, DevExpress provides enterprise JavaScript components. A match made in heaven (Krakow)! Guess what, there's great integration with Oracle JET. Here's the DevExtreme Scheduler, integrated into the Oracle JET Quick Start Basic template: Take a look at all the enterprise widgets here: https://js.devexpress.com/Demos/WidgetsGallery/ The starting point for doing the above is to take a look at this extremely useful example, which is focused on integrating DevExtreme with Require and Knockout: https://github.com/DevExpress/devextreme-examples/tree/16_2/requirejs-knockout [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago
The 3rd NetBeans Day took place in London today! (Go here for the 2016 report and here for the 2015 report.) As before, NetBeans Day UK took place at the beautiful and historic Greenwich University. Many people were involved in making the event ... [More] possible, such as Chris Walshaw, lecturer at Greenwich University, and Laura Muncey also from Greenwich University; Mark Stephens, Zain Arshad, and Georgia Ingham from IDR Solutions; Mike Croft and Andrew Pielage from Payara; Neil C. Smith from Praxis LIVE; and John Kostaras who came all the way from Belgium. Also present to do sessions and demos were Vladimir Voskresensky and Petr Kudryavtsev from Oracle Russia, as well as Chris Seaton from Oracle Labs. Paul Tinker from the local Oracle office was present as well, supporting the Oracle JET workshop. There was a lot of engagement and interaction between attendees, which was really cool. We focused a lot on providing informal opportunities, e.g., workshops and activities in the lunch area, for people to chat in an informal way. E.g., those without laptops in the workshops were quickly paired up with those with laptops, so that new connections were established while working with NetBeans IDE!  The day began with a warm welcome from Chris Walshaw and myself, followed by an overview of the history of NetBeans IDE and an update on the Apache NetBeans process. This was followed by Chris Seaton's intoduction to Graal/Truffle, i.e., the new fast polyglot JVM being developed by Oracle Labs. Mark and Zain then did a "NetBeans 101", with lots of tips and tricks, quite a few of which came back in discussions I had with people afterwards. All this was followed by lunch. We had put tables throughout the lunch area and various attendees demoed and hacked code with attendees. For example, we had briefly introduced their projects to the whole group, e.g., Vladimir introduced the C/C++/Java integration work done in Oracle Russia via Oracle Solaris Studio, which he discussed at one of the tables in the lunch room. Meanwhile, Neil C. Smith showed off PRAXIS Live at another table and discussed it with those interested in that topic, while eating lunch. I.e., the lunch room became a hacker garden, where whoever wanted to hear more about a topic brought their lunch and hung out and discussed with others on particular topics.  After which the group split into two tracks for workshops. Based on previous surveys, workshops were something missing from previous events, i.e., opportunities to learn new things and actually code and use them at the same time. We set up two workshops in parallel, the first on Java 9 and Jigsaw, while the other room had a Java EE microservices session with the Payara team. The Java 9 session, introduced by John Kostaras, was pretty interesting, i.e., seeing attendees playing with JShell and Jigsaw for the first time. After that followed a session on Oracle JET in parallel with a NetBeans IDE plugin development session. The choices were hard to make, i.e., quite a few would have wanted to attend all the workshops, though the day wasn't long enough for that! Many thanks to Paul Tinker for the excellent help during the Oracle JET session, his assistance made a big difference also because I had to rush off to the airport for the next conference. The day ended with a prize draw for books, including "Java EE 7 Recipes", kindly donated by its author Josh Juneau, and "Java EE 7 with NetBeans 8" kindly donated by David Heffelfinger, followed by the inevitable hangout at a local pub! All the resources used throughout the day are available here: https://github.com/NetBeansDay/042517-London [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago
The 3rd NetBeans Day took place in London today! (Go here for the 2016 report and here for the 2015 report.) As before, NetBeans Day UK took place at the beautiful and historic Greenwich University. Many people were involved in making the event ... [More] possible, such as Chris Walshaw, lecturer at Greenwich University; Mark Stephens, Zain Arshad, and Georgia Ingham from IDR Solutions; Mike Croft and Andrew Pielage from Payara; Neil C. Smith from Praxis LIVE; and John Kostaras who came all the way from Belgium. Also present to do sessions and demos were Vladimir Voskresensky and Petr Kudryavtsev from Oracle Russia, as well as Chris Seaton from Oracle Labs. Paul Tinker from the local Oracle office was present as well, supporting the Oracle JET workshop. There was a lot of engagement and interaction between attendees, which was really cool. We focused a lot on providing informal opportunities, e.g., workshops and activities in the lunch area, for people to chat in an informal way. E.g., those without laptops in the workshops were quickly paired up with those with laptops, so that new connections were established while working with NetBeans IDE!  The day began with a warm welcome from Chris Walshaw and myself, followed by an overview of the history of NetBeans IDE and an update on the Apache NetBeans process. This was followed by Chris Seaton's intoduction to Graal/Truffle, i.e., the new fast polyglot JVM being developed by Oracle Labs. Mark and Zain then did a "NetBeans 101", with lots of tips and tricks, quite a few of which came back in discussions I had with people afterwards. All this was followed by lunch. We had put tables throughout the lunch area and various attendees demoed and hacked code with attendees. For example, we had briefly introduced their projects to the whole group, e.g., Vladimir introduced the C/C++/Java integration work done in Oracle Russia via Oracle Solaris Studio, which he discussed at one of the tables in the lunch room. Meanwhile, Neil C. Smith showed off PRAXIS Live at another table and discussed it with those interested in that topic, while eating lunch. I.e., the lunch room became a hacker garden, where whoever wanted to hear more about a topic brought their lunch and hung out and discussed with others on particular topics.  After which the group split into two tracks for workshops. Based on previous surveys, workshops were something missing from previous events, i.e., opportunities to learn new things and actually code and use them at the same time. We set up two workshops in parallel, the first on Java 9 and Jigsaw, while the other room had a Java EE microservices session with the Payara team. The Java 9 session, introduced by John Kostaras, was pretty interesting, i.e., seeing attendees playing with JShell and Jigsaw for the first time. After that followed a session on Oracle JET in parallel with a NetBeans IDE plugin development session. The choices were hard to make, i.e., quite a few would have wanted to attend all the workshops, though the day wasn't long enough for that! Many thanks to Paul Tinker for the excellent help during the Oracle JET session, his assistance made a big difference also because I had to rush off to the airport for the next conference. The day ended with a prize draw for books, including "Java EE 7 Recipes", kindly donated by its author Josh Juneau, and "Java EE 7 with NetBeans 8" kindly donated by David Heffelfinger, followed by the inevitable hangout at a local pub! All the resources used throughout the day are available here: https://github.com/NetBeansDay/042517-London [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago
GlassFish v5 ea (Java EE 8) builds available for download: http://download.oracle.com/glassfish/5.0/index.html The nightly build is also available from docklands as glassfish5 and glassfish5-ping Dockerfiles. Binary images are directly available ... [More] from the public docker registry: https://hub.docker.com/u/airhacks/. To start glassfishv5 perform docker run -d -p 8080:8080 --name glassfishv5 airhacks/glassfish-ping The ping should be availabe after ~3 secs under: http://localhost:8080/ping. See you at Java EE Microservices. Is Munich's airport too far? Learn from home: javaeemicro.services. Real World Java EE Workshops [Airport Munich]> [Less]
Posted about 1 month ago
Some months ago I created a small useful NetBeans plugin, which allows to you to save time when pasting code samples from online tutorials. Today I used it again and I still find it very useful in this specific context. And it saves you time. That is ... [More] why I want to report about it. What is the feature? You can copy the Java source code of whole classes from a tutorial and paste it via Menu|Edit|Paste to new file. Either the package declaration of the Java class is taken in account or the Java class is placed in the correct package. This depends on the selected node and it is documented included screencasts at https://github.com/markiewb/nb-paste-to-new-file. That sounds familiar? Yes, this feature already exists natively in Eclipse JDT and Intellij IDEA. Give it a try, when using NetBeans! Happy coding. BTW: I am still looking for maintainers for my plugins! Because of time issues, I will not bugfix nor implement features anymore. Support your favorite IDE and by contribution to your favorite plugin! [Less]