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  Analyzed 8 months ago based on code collected almost 2 years ago.
 
Posted about 8 years ago
At the end of this week I'll leave TÜBİTAK /UEKAE and start to work for IBM. It doesn't mean that I'm leaving Pardus, I'll continue to maintain my packages and bugs too like other pardus developers. Doesn't matter where you work for as long as ... [More] you're in the open source community, so I'll be around...

I would like to say thank you Tekman and rest of the team for everything, I'm so proud to work with you guys.
I love you Pardus and always have... [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
Pardus Linux gives the opportunity to start your own local svn server very quickly !
Just launch Tasma, your friendly Pardus Configuration Center, and from the System module, click on the Service Manager.
Here you can see listed as an ... [More] available service (but not currently running) the SVN server.
Click on it and then run it...
Wait young Jedi, you are not totally done yet ! ^^
If you type ps -eaf | grep svnserve in your Yakuake (I am in love with this terminal since the first day I launched it !), you will find something like this :
apache 3755 1 0 23:55 ? 00:00:00 /usr/bin/svnserve --foreground --daemon --root=/var/svn

Oh ho... has Pardus made it work directly...
well not really... Actually there is no such thing as /var/svn yet !
First thing first let's create the directory :
$ su
# mkdir /var/svn
In order to create repositories, you have to use svnadmin :
# svnadmin create /var/svn/repository

Have a look at http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.1/ch06s03.html for more information as how to
administer your server...
Personnally I prefer accessing it through ssh.
In order to do that, use your Service Manager to fire the ssh server... and then you can access your svn server thanks to the url :
svn list svn ssh://localhost/var/run/repository
It will ask you for a password and then will not give you any error message... meaning your server is ready for the initial import !!
Enjoy ! [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
Great news from Linux Quake team! We made an interview with LordHavoc - the Darkplace’s author. He talks about his latest project, security modules, and lots of technical Quake 1 goodness:

>>…How are things ?

Somewhat ... [More] confusing since I have two main projects…

My main focus at this point is on my new engine DarkWar [no website yet] which
is a minimalist engine based on modeled maps which do not require compilation
(in stark contrast to Quake), and data-driven game system (spreadsheet
describing all the game objects), which is being used for the DarkWar game - a
teamplay oriented multiplayer FPS game that introduces some new gameplay
concepts such as physics playing a big role in gameplay (and I’m not talking
about throwing barrels around . and is intended to be a complete competitive
online gaming experience with tournaments, stats, a clan system, and other
features.

>> What form do the maps take ?

The maps are constructed entirely out of entities, most of them static models
(such as buildings, terrain, barrels/crates/other props, etc).

I’m trying to take it a new direction, a less traveled path, as there are
plenty of ‘ordinary’ engines out there.

The maps can pick a spreadsheet describing all game objects (effectively, a
mod), so one level could be a space battle, another a counterstrike-like
mission, another knights fighting undead, it’s all data driven.

>> And how is Darkplaces going ?

I still maintain DarkPlaces engine (as I pledged to do on an inside3d.com
thread) [no URL available] which is mostly in bugfix mode at this point, I do
add features occasionally but that is not my main activity anymore, I still
take bug reports and feature suggestions but I no longer take requests
(requests are more of a demand than a suggestion, and that gets unpleasant
quickly).

Mostly I maintain DarkPlaces for Quake players and Nexuiz players.

On the DarkPlaces front, I must point out that q3map2 and GTKRadiant annoy me
to no end, their limitations cage the mind, and their bugs make development all
the more unpleasant. And although I’m on the GTKRadiant team I never have time
to work on it.

When I make Nexuiz maps I use q3map2 and GTKRadiant only because I have no
choice, for Q1 maps I do have a choice but it involves either wine or my spare
computer (whose monitor is a blurry CRT), not
a pleasant editing experience.

Read the rest of the interview from LinuxQuake.org or download PDF! [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
18 March 1915; Turkey defeats the final attempt by the British and French fleet to force the straits. Three battleships are sunk by mines. Three battleships and the battlecruiser HMS Inflexible are badly damaged.Taken from wikipedia

And more ... [More] to come, just after we setup Pardus Terminal Server for Çanakkale 18 Mart Üniversity Library now a lab in Computer Engineering department will use Pardus as default operating system on more than 30 computers. Also we made a repository mirror at pardus.comu.edu.tr [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
What is a security ninja?

Well, hard to define them actually. They are superior beings that are able to handle huge armies of bugs single-handedly.

Following are some of the attributes of security ninjas:

1. They ... [More] don’t sleep. There is no time to sleep for a security ninja. Bugs can come from any where, any time.

2. One security ninja is actually an army of security ninjas. And yes, this is recursive! But can not be understood by mere mortals.

3. They are so fast that they nearly kill the bugs before they appear.

4. They are the masters of many arts. Some say this can not be done. Obviously this is related to the speed of security ninjas that they craft their arts in the blink of an eye that can not be catched by those.

5. The one thing that a security ninja hates most is a bug specie named Paradisea haemastica perspicillata (aka. php).

An urban myth says, a project named “Pardus” at the sacred woods of Gebze has a one of a kind security ninja. [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
What is a security ninja?

Well, hard to define them actually. They are superior beings that are able to handle huge armies of bugs single-handedly.

Following are some of the attributes of security ninjas:

1. They don't ... [More] sleep. There is no time to sleep for a security ninja. Bugs can come from any where, any time.

2. One security ninja is actually an army of security ninjas. And yes, this is recursive! But can not be understood by mere mortals.

3. They are so fast that they nearly kill the bugs before they appear.

4. They are the masters of many arts. Some say this can not be done. Obviously this is related to the speed of security ninjas that they craft their arts in the blink of an eye that can not be catched by those.

5. The one thing that a security ninja hates most is a bug specie named Paradisea haemastica perspicillata (aka. php).

An urban myth says, a project named "Pardus" at the sacred woods of Gebze has a one of a kind security ninja. [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
Watch the live performance or the TRUTH
Posted about 8 years ago
As of March, 09 we've completed our application for Google
Summer of Code
2007. Here
are some of the ideas we came out with.

All work for the new release (Pardus 2007.1 Felis chaus) is
done and ISOs ... [More] are created. However, we have to wait a few more
days before announcing the release for PR related jobs to
conclude.

Being one of the early adopters of 2007.1, Çanakkale Onsekiz
Mart University started using Pardus and KDE in the
university.

more photos

Parallelize applications for faster Linux
booting article on developerWorks also mentions about Pardus'
Python-based init system Mudur (appearently author didn't realized
that Pardus is the name of the distribution and Mudur is the init
system :). [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
This year we have decided to participate to Google Summer of Code and completed our application as of yesterday. Our in-house developers have come out with a number of very nice project ideas, which are good-to-have features in Pardus, either based ... [More] on Pardus technologies or very closely related to the ease-of-use design goal we have. You may reach our GSoC ideas page here. Any further suggestions will be discussed at and proscpetive students are encouraged to join to the gsoc e-mail list at pardus.org.tr. [Less]
Posted about 8 years ago
I should done this a long time ago but it's not too late, Join FSF as an Associate Member!

Join us now and share the software;
You'll be free, hackers, you'll be free.

Hoarders may get piles of money,
That is true, hackers ... [More] , that is true.
But they cannot help their neighbors;
That's not good, hackers, that's not good.

When we have enough free software
At our call, hackers, at our call,
We'll throw out those dirty licenses
Ever more, hackers, ever more. [Less]