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Posted 1 day ago
Jeremy Bicha wrote up an unknown Ubuntu feature: “printing” direct to a Google Drive PDF. I rather wanted this, but I don’t run the Gnome desktop, so I thought I might be out of luck. But no! It works fine on my Ubuntu MATE desktop too. A couple of ... [More] extra tweaks are required, though. This is unfortunately a bit technical, but it should only need setting up once. You need the Gnome Control Centre and Gnome Online Accounts installed, if you don’t have them already, as well as the Google Cloud Print extension that Jeremy mentions. From a terminal, run sudo apt install gnome-control-center gnome-online-accounts cpdb-backend-gcp. Next, you need to launch the Control Centre, but it doesn’t like you if you’re not running the Gnome desktop. So, we lie to it. In that terminal, run XDG_CURRENT_DESKTOP=GNOME gnome-control-center online-accounts. This should correctly start the Control Centre, showing the online accounts. Sign in to your Google account using that window. (I only have Files and Printers selected; you don’t need Mail and Calendars and so on to get this printing working.) Then… it all works. From now on, when you go to print something, the print dialogue will, after a couple of seconds, show a new entry: “Save to Google Drive”. Choose that, and your document will “print” to a PDF stored in Google Drive. Easy peasy. Nice one Jeremy for the write-up. It’d be neat if Ubuntu MATE could integrate this a little more tightly. [Less]
Posted 1 day ago
Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 549 for the week of October 7 – 13, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here. In this issue we cover: Cosmic Cuttlefish (18.10) Final Freeze Ubuntu Stats Hot in Support LoCo Events Mir ... [More] News: 12th of October 2018 Canonical News In the Blogosphere Featured Audio and Video Meeting Reports Upcoming Meetings and Events Updates and Security for 14.04, 16.04, and 18.04 And much more! The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by: Krytarik Raido Bashing-om Chris Guiver Wild Man And many others If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki! Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License [Less]
Posted 2 days ago
It’s been quite a while since I had written a post now. Lots of things have changed around here but even though I am not actively developing for Ubuntu itself any more it doesn’t mean that I’ve left the Ubuntu and FOSS world in general. In fact, I’ve ... [More] been pretty busy hacking on some more free software goodness. Some few have sure heard about it, but for the biggest part, allow me to introduce you to nymea. nymea is an IoT platform mainly based on Ubuntu. Well, that’s where we develop on, we provide packages for debian and snaps for all the platforms supporting snaps too. It consists of 3 parts: nymea:core, nymea:app and nymea:cloud. The purpose of this project is to enable easy integration of various things with each other. Being plugin-based, it allows to make all sorts of things (devices, online services…) work together. Practically speaking this means two things: – It will allow users to have a completely open source smart home setup which does everything offline. Everything is processed offline, including the smartness. Turning your living room lights on when it gets dark? nymea will do it, and it’ll do it even without your internet connection. It comes with nymea:core to be installed on a gateway device in your home (a Raspberry Pi, or any other device that can run Ubuntu/Debian or snapd) and nymea:app, available in app stores and also as a desktop app in the snap store. – It delivers a developer platform for device makers. Looking for a solution that easily allows you to make your device smart? Ubuntu:core + nymea:core together will get you sorted in no time to have an app for your “thing” and allow it to react on just about any input it gets. nymea:cloud is an optional feature to nymea:core and nymea:app and allows to extend the nymea system with features like remote connection, push notifications or Alexa integration (not released yet). So if that got you curious, check out https://wiki.nymea.io (and perhaps https://nymea.io in general) or simply install nymea and nymea-app and get going (on snap systems you need to connect some plugs and iterfaces for all the bits and pieces to work, alternatively we have a ppa ready for use too). [Less]
Posted 2 days ago
I am pleased to announce the release of Xfce Screensaver (xfce4-screensaver) 0.1.0! This is an early release targeted to testers and translators. Bugs and patches welcome! About Xfce Screensaver is a screen saver and locker that aims to have simple ... [More] , sane, secure defaults and be well integrated with the Xfce desktop. It is a port of MATE Screensaver, itself a port of GNOME Screensaver. It has been tightly integrated with the Xfce desktop, utilizing Xfce libraries and the Xfconf configuration backend. Homepage · Bugzilla · Git Features Integration with the Xfce Desktop per-monitor wallpaper Locking down of configuration settings via Xfconf DBUS interface to limited screensaver interaction Full translation support into many languages Shared styles with LightDM GTK+ Greeter Support for XScreensaver screensavers User switching Requirements DBus >= 0.30 GLib >= 2.50.0 GTK+ >= 3.22.0 X11 >= 1.0 garcon >= 0.5.0 libxklavier >= 5.2 libxfce4ui >= 4.12.1 libxfce4util >= 4.12.1 Xfconf >= 4.12.1 Screenshots Click to view slideshow. Downloads Please be aware that this is alpha-quality software. It is not currently recommended for use in production machines. I invite you to test it, report bugs, provide feedback, and submit patches so we can get it ready for the world. Source tarball (md5, sha1, sha256) [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
Neste episódio falámos de Pinebooks, Librem Key, SolusOS e muito mais. Um episódio repleto de informação relevante sobre os temas que têm dominado a actualidade. Já sabes: Ouve, subscreve e partilha! ... [More] https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2018/09/ubuntu-14-04-extended-security-maintenance-esm https://blog.ubuntu.com/2018/09/19/extended-security-maintenance-ubuntu-14-04-trusty-tahr https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2018/09/hyper-v-ubuntu-1804-windows-integration https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Mir-1.0-Next-Gen-Released https://blog.ubuntu.com/2018/09/21/iot-graphics-mir-release-1-0 https://puri.sm/posts/introducing-the-librem-key Atribuição e licenças A imagem: Photo on Visualhunt.com A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da CC0 1.0 Universal License. Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
There is an interesting hidden feature available in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and newer. To enable this feature, first install cpdb-backend-gcp. sudo apt install cpdb-backend-gcp Make sure you are signed in to Google with GNOME Online Accounts. Open the ... [More] Settings app1gnome-control-center to the Online Accounts page. If your Google account is near the top above the Add an account section, then you’re all set. Now when you print a document, there will be an extra Save to Google Drive option. If you have any Google Cloud Print printers, they should show up here too. Saving to Google Drive saves a PDF of your document to your Google Drive account. This feature was developed by Nilanjana Lodh and Abhijeet Dubey when they were Google Summer of Code 2017 participants. Their mentors were Till Kamppeter, Aveek Basu, and Felipe Borges. Till has been trying to get this feature installed by default in Ubuntu since 18.04 LTS, but it looks like it won’t make it in until 19.04. I haven’t seen this feature packaged in any other Linux distros yet. That might be because people don’t know about this feature so that’s why I’m posting about it today! If you are a distro packager, the 3 packages you need are cpdb-libs , cpdb-backend-gcp, and cpdb-backend-cups. The final package enables easy printing to any IPP printer. (I didn’t mention it earlier because I believe Ubuntu 18.04 LTS already supports that feature through a different package.) [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
There is an interesting hidden feature available in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and newer. To enable this feature, first install cpdb-backend-gcp. sudo apt install cpdb-backend-gcp Make sure you are signed in to Google with GNOME Online Accounts. Open the ... [More] Settings app1gnome-control-center to the Online Accounts page. If your Google account is near the top above the Add an account section, then you’re all set. Now when you print a document, there will be an extra Save to Google Drive option. If you have any Google Cloud Print printers, they should show up here too. Saving to Google Drive saves a PDF of your document to your Google Drive account. This feature was developed by Nilanjana Lodh and Abhijeet Dubey when they were Google Summer of Code 2007 participants. Their mentors were Till Kampetter, Aveek Basu, and Felipe Borges. Till has been trying to get this feature installed by default in Ubuntu since 18.04 LTS, but it looks like it won’t make it in until 19.04. I haven’t seen this feature packaged in any other Linux distros yet. That might be because people don’t know about this feature so that’s why I’m posting about it today! If you are a distro packager, the 3 packages you need are cpdb-libs , cpdb-backend-gcp, and cpdb-backend-cups. The final package enables easy printing to any IPP printer. (I didn’t mention it earlier because I believe Ubuntu 18.04 LTS already supports that feature through a different package.) [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
The Ubuntu release team have announced a 1st test ISO RC build for all 18.10 flavours. Please help us test these and subsequent RC builds, so that we can have an amazing and well tested release in the coming week. As noted below, the initial builds ... [More] will NOT be the final ones. Over the next few hours, builds will start popping on the Cosmic Final milestone page[1] on the ISO tracker. These builds are not final. We're still waiting on a few more fixes, a few things to migrate, etc. I've intentionally not updated base-files or the ISO labels to reflect the release status (so please don't file bugs about those). What there are, however, are "close enough" for people to be testing in anger, filing bugs, fixing bugs, iterating image builds, and testing all over again. So, please, don't wait until Wednesday night to test, testing just before release is TOO LATE to get anything fixed. Get out there, grab your favourite ISO, beat it up, report bugs, escalate bugs, get things fixed, respin (if you're a flavour lead with access), and test, test... And test. Did I mention testing? Please[2] test. Thanks, ... Adam [1] http://iso.qa.ubuntu.com/qatracker/milestones/397/builds [2] Please. Downloads for RC builds can be found by following the link after clicking through to ‘Cosmic Final’ on the Ubuntu ISO tracker. Please report test case results if you have a Ubuntu SSO account (or are prepared to make one). Feedback can also be given via our normal email lists, IRC, forums etc. Upgrade testing from 18.04 in installed systems (VM or otherwise) is also a very useful way to help prepare for the new release. Instructions for upgrade can be found on the Ubuntu help wiki. Ubuntu ISO tracker: http://iso.qa.ubuntu.com/qatracker/ Kubuntu-devel mailing list: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-devel Kubuntu IRC channels: #kubuntu & #kubuntu-devel on irc.freenode.net Kubuntu 18.10 Upgrade instructions: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CosmicUpgrades/Kubuntu [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
Adam Conrad always does a great job in stating that people should test the Release Candidates. Here’s what he has said this time: Over the next few hours, builds will start popping on the Cosmic Final milestone page[1] on the ISO tracker. These builds are not final. We’re still waiting on a few more fixes, […]
Posted 4 days ago
I’m back to blogging, after shutting down my wordpress.com hosted blog in spring. This time, fully privacy aware, self hosted, and integrated with mastodon. Let’s talk details: In spring, I shutdown my wordpress.com hosted blog, due to concerns ... [More] about GDPR implications with comment hosting and ads and stuff. I’d like to apologize for using that, back when I did this (in 2007), it was the easiest way to get into blogging. Please forgive me for subjecting you to that! Recently, Google announced the end of Google+. As some of you might know, I posted a lot of medium-long posts there, rather than doing blog posts; especially after I disabled the wordpress site. With the end of Google+, I want to try something new: I’ll host longer pieces on this blog, and post shorter messages on @juliank@mastodon.social. If you follow the Mastodon account, you will see toots for each new blog post as well, linking to the blog post. Mastodon integration and privacy Now comes the interesting part: If you reply to the toot, your reply will be shown on the blog itself. This works with a tiny bit of JavaScript that talks to a simple server-side script that finds toots from me mentioning the blog post, and then replies to that. This protects your privacy, because mastodon.social does not see which blog post you are looking at, because it is contacted by the server, not by you. Rendering avatars requires loading images from mastodon.social’s file server, however - to improve your privacy, all avatars are loaded with referrerpolicy='no-referrer', so assuming your browser is half-way sane, it should not be telling mastodon.social which post you visited either. In fact, the entire domain also sets Referrer-Policy: no-referrer as an http header, so any link you follow will not have a referrer set. The integration was originally written by @bjoern@mastodon.social – I have done some moderate improvements to adapt it to my theme, make it more reusable, and replace and extend the caching done in a JSON file with a Redis database. Source code This blog is free software; generated by the Hugo snap. All source code for it is available: The blog posts are provided at github.com/julian-klode/blog.jak-linux.org. under the terms of the CC BY-SA 4.0 license. The theme is called Ernest, and is a fork of the Hemingway theme. You can find it at github.com/julian-klode/ernest. It is licensed under the MIT license, with server-side scripts under the AGPL, and some vendorized parts under different licenses. (Yes I am aware that hosting the repositories on GitHub is a bit ironic given the whole focus on privacy and self-hosting). The theme makes use of Hugo pipes to minify and fingerprint JavaScript, and vendorizes all dependencies instead of embedding CDN links, to, again, protect your privacy. Future work I think I want to make the theme dark, to be more friendly to the eyes. I also might want to make the mastodon integration a bit more friendly to use. And I want to get rid of jQuery, it’s only used for a handful of calls in the Mastodon integration JavaScript. If you have any other idea for improvements, feel free to join the conversation in the mastodon toot, send me an email, or open an issue at the github projects. Closing thoughts I think the end of Google+ will be an interesting time, requring a lot of people in the open source world to replace one of their main communication channels with a different approach. Mastodon and Diaspora are both in the race, and I fear the community will split or everyone will have two accounts in the end. I personally think that Mastodon + syndicated blogs provide a good balance: You can quickly write short posts (up to 500 characters), and you can host long articles on your own and link to them. I hope that one day diaspora* and mastodon federate together. If we end up with one federated network that would be the best outcome. [Less]