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Posted 2 days ago
Kuro5hin (pronounced “corrosion” and abbreviated K5) was a website created in 1999 that was popular in the early 2000s. K5 users could post stories to be voted upon as well as entries to their personal diaries. I posted a couple dozen diary entries ... [More] between 2002 and 2003 during my final year of college and the months immediately after. K5 was taken off-line in 2016 and the Internet Archive doesn’t seem to have snagged comments or full texts of most diary entries. Luckily, someone managed to scrape most of them before they went offline. Thanks to this archive, you can now once again hear from 21-year-old-me in the form of my old K5 diary entries which I’ve imported to my blog Copyrighteous. I fixed the obvious spelling errors but otherwise restrained myself and left them intact. If you’re interested in preserving your own K5 diaries, I wrote some Python code to parse the K5 HTML files for diary pages and import them into WordPress using it’s XML-RPC API. You’ll need to tweak the code to use it but it’s pretty straightforward. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago by nore...@blogger.com (Dustin Kirkland)
February 2008, Canonical's office in Lexington, MA 10 years ago today, I joined Canonical, on the very earliest version of the Ubuntu Server Team!And in the decade since, I've had the tremendous privilege to work with so many amazing people, and ... [More] the opportunity to contribute so much open source software to the Ubuntu ecosystem.Marking the occasion, I've reflected about much of my work over that time period and thought I'd put down in writing a few of the things I'm most proud of (in chronological order)...  Maybe one day, my daughters will read this and think their daddy was a real geek :-) 1. update-motd / motd.ubuntu.com (September 2008) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2008/09/update-motd-in-ubuntu-intrepid.html Throughout the history of UNIX, the "message of the day" was always manually edited and updated by the local system administrator.  Until Ubuntu's message-of-the-day.  In fact, I received an email from Dennis Ritchie and Jon "maddog" Hall, confirming this, in April 2010.  This started as a feature request for the Landscape team, but has turned out to be tremendously useful and informative to all Ubuntu users.  Just last year, we launched motd.ubuntu.com, which provides even more dynamic information about important security vulnerabilities and general news from the Ubuntu ecosystem.  Mathias Gug help me with the design and publication. 2. manpages.ubuntu.com (September 2008) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2008/09/announcing-ubuntu-manpage-repository.html This was the first public open source project I worked on, in my spare time at Canonical.  I had a local copy of the Ubuntu archive and I was thinking about what sorts of automated jobs I could run on it.  So I wrote some scripts that extracted the manpages out of each one, formatted them as HTML, and published into a structured set of web directories.  10 years later, it's still up and running, serving thousands of hits per day.  In fact, this was one of the ways we were able to shrink the Ubuntu minimal image, but removing the manpages, since they're readable online.  Colin Watson and Kees Cook helped me with the initial implementation, and Matthew Nuzum helped with the CSS and Ubuntu theme in the HTML. 3. Byobu (December 2008) If you know me at all, you know my passion for the command line UI/UX that is "Byobu".  Byobu was born as the "screen-profiles" project, over lunch at Google in Mountain View, in December of 2008, at the Ubuntu Developer Summit.  Around the lunch table, several of us (including Nick Barcet, Dave Walker, Michael Halcrow, and others), shared our tips and tricks from our own ~/.screenrc configuration files.  In Cape Town, February 2010, at the suggestion of Gustavo Niemeyer, I ported Byobu from Screen to Tmux.  Since Ubuntu Servers don't generally have GUIs, Byobu is designed to be a really nice interface to the Ubuntu command line environment.4. eCryptfs / Ubuntu Encrypted Home Directories (October 2009) http://www.linux-mag.com/id/7568/ I was familiar with eCryptfs from its inception in 2005, in the IBM Linux Technology Center's Security Team, sitting next to Michael Halcrow who was the original author.  When I moved to Canonical, I helped Michael maintain the userspace portion of eCryptfs (ecryptfs-utils) and I shepherded into Ubuntu.  eCryptfs was super powerful, with hundreds of options and supported configurations, but all of that proved far to difficult for users at large.  So I set out to simplify it drastically, with an opinionated set of basic defaults.  I started with a simple command to mount a "Private" directory inside of your home directory, where you could stash your secrets.  A few months later, on a long flight to Paris, I managed to hack a new PAM module, pam_ecryptfs.c, that actually encrypted your entire home directory!  This was pretty revolutionary at the time -- predating Apple's FileVault or Microsoft's Bitlocker, even.  Today, tens of millions of Ubuntu users have used eCryptfs to secure their personal data.  I worked closely with Tyler Hicks, Kees Cook, Jamie Strandboge, Michael Halcrow, Colin Watson, and Martin Pitt on this project over the years. 5. ssh-import-id (March 2010) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2010/03/introducing-ssh-import-lp-id.html With the explosion of virtual machines and cloud instances in 2009 / 2010, I found myself constantly copying public SSH keys around.  Moreover, given Canonical's globally distributed nature, I also regularly found myself asking someone for their public SSH keys, so that I could give them access to an instance, perhaps for some pair programming or assistance debugging.  As it turns out, everyone I worked with, had a Launchpad.net account, and had their public SSH keys available there.  So I created (at first) a simple shell script to securely fetch and install those keys.  Scott Moser helped clean up that earliest implementation.  Eventually, I met Casey Marshall, who helped rewrite it entirely in Python.  Moreover, we contacted the maintainers of Github, and asked them to expose user public SSH keys by the API -- which they did!  Now, ssh-import-id is integrated directly into Ubuntu's new subiquity installer and used by many other tools, such as cloud-init and MAAS. 6. Orchestra / MAAS (August 2011)http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2011/08/formal-introduction-to-ubuntu-orchestra.htmlIn 2009, Canonical purchased 5 Dell laptops, which was the Ubuntu Server team's first "cloud".  These laptops were our very first lab for deploying and testing Eucalyptus clouds.  I was responsible for those machines at my house for a while, and I automated their installation with PXE, TFTP, DHCP, DNS, and a ton of nasty debian-installer preseed data.  That said -- it worked!  As it turned out, Scott Moser and Mathias Gug had both created similar setups at their houses for the same reason.  I was mentoring a new hire at Canonical, named Andres Rodriquez at the time, and he took over our part-time hacks and we worked together to create the Orchestra project.  Orchestra, itself was short lived.  It was severely limited by Cobbler as a foundation technology.  So the Orchestra project was killed by Canonical.  But, six months later, a new project was created, based on the same general concept -- physical machine provisioning at scale -- with an entire squad of engineers led by...Andres Rodriguez :-)  MAAS today is easily one of the most important projects the Ubuntu ecosystem and one of the most successful products in Canonical's portfolio.7. pollinate / pollen / entropy.ubuntu.com (February 2014) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2014/02/random-seeds-in-ubuntu-1404-lts-cloud.html In 2013, I set out to secure Ubuntu at large from a set of attacks ranging from insufficient entropy at first boot.  This was especially problematic in virtual machine instances, in public clouds, where every instance is, by design, exactly identical to many others.  Moreover, the first thing that instance does, is usually ... generate SSH keys.  This isn't hypothetical -- it's quite real.  Raspberry Pi's running Debian were deemed susceptible to this exact problem in November 2015.  So designed and implemented a client (shell script that runs at boot, and fetches some entropy from one to many sources), as well as a high-performance server (golang).  The client is the 'pollinate' script, which runs on the first boot of every Ubuntu server, and the server is the cluster of physical machines processing hundreds of requests per minute at entropy.ubuntu.com.  Many people helped review the design and implementation, including Kees Cook, Jamie Strandboge, Seth Arnold, Tyler Hicks, James Troup, Scott Moser, Steve Langasek, Gustavo Niemeyer, and others. 8. The Orange Box (May 2014) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2014/05/the-orange-box-cloud-for-free-man.html In December of 2011, in my regular 1:1 with my manager, Mark Shuttleworth, I told him about these new "Intel NUCs", which I had bought and placed them around my house.  I had 3, each of which was running Ubuntu, and attached to a TV around the house, as a media player (music, videos, pictures, etc).  In their spare time, though, they were OpenStack Nova nodes, capable of running a couple of virtual machines.  Mark immediately asked, "How many of those could you fit into a suitcase?"  Within 24 hours, Mark had reached out to the good folks at TranquilPC and introduced me to my new mission -- designing the Orange Box.  I worked with the Tranquil folks through Christmas, and we took our first delivery of 5 of these boxes in January of 2014.  Each chassis held 10 little Intel NUC servers, and a switch, as well as a few peripherals.  Effectively, it's a small data center that travels.  We spend the next 4 months working on the hardware under wraps and then unveiled them at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta in May 2014.  We've gone through a couple of iterations on the hardware and software over the last 4 years, and these machines continue to deliver tremendous value, from live demos on the booth, to customer workshops on premises, or simply accelerating our own developer productivity by "shipping them a lab in a suitcase".  I worked extensively with Dan Poler on this project, over the course of a couple of years. 9. Hollywood (December 2014) http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2014/12/hollywood-technodrama.html Perhaps the highlight of my professional career came in October of 2016.  Watching Saturday Night Live with my wife Kim, we were laughing at a skit that poked fun at another of my favorite shows, Mr. Robot.  On the computer screen behind the main character, I clearly spotted Hollywood!  Hollywood is just a silly, fun little project I created on a plane one day, mostly to amuse Kim.  But now, it's been used in Saturday Night Live, NBC Dateline News, and an Experian TV commercials!  Even Jess Frazelle created a Docker container.  10. petname / golang-petname / python-petname (January 2015)http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2015/01/introducing-petname-libraries-for.htmlFrom "warty warthog" to "bionic beaver", we've always had a focus on fun, and user experience here in Ubuntu.  How hard is it to talk to your colleague about your Amazon EC2 instance, "i-83ab39f93e"?  Or your container "adfxkenw"?  We set out to make something a little more user-friendly with our "petnames".  Petnames are randomly generated "adjective-animal" names, which are easy to pronounce, spell, and remember.  I curated and created libraries that are easily usable in Shell, Golang, and Python.  With the help of colleagues like Stephane Graber and Andres Rodriguez, we now use these in many places in the Ubuntu ecosystem, such as LXD and MAAS.If you've read this post, thank you for indulging me in a nostalgic little trip down memory lane!  I've had an amazing time designing, implementing, creating, and innovating with some of the most amazing people in the entire technology industry.  And here's to a productive, fun future!Cheers,:-Dustin [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
We’re on our way to the 18.04 LTS release and it’s time for another community wallpaper contest! How to participate? For a chance to win, submit your submission at contest.xubuntu.org. Important dates Start of submissions: Immediately Submission ... [More] deadline: March 15th, 2018 Announcement of selections: Late March All dates are in UTC. Contest terms All submissions must adhere to the Terms and Guidelines, including specifics about subject matter, image resolution and attribution. After the submission deadline, the Xubuntu team will pick 6 winners from all submissions for inclusion on the Xubuntu 18.04 ISO, and will also be available to other Xubuntu version users as a xubuntu-community-wallpaper package . The winners will also receive some Xubuntu stickers. Any questions? Please join #xubuntu-devel on Freenode for assistance or email the Xubuntu developer mailing list if you have any problems with your submission. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
If you’ve spent any time in the Snapcraft forum, it’s quite likely you’ve come across Dan Llewellyn – a keen community advocate or self-proclaimed Snapcrafter. Dan has always had a passion for computing and is completely self-taught. Outside of the ... [More] community, Dan is a freelance WordPress developer. After getting into the open source world around 1998, he has switched between various Linux distros including Suse, RedHat, Gentoo before settling on Ubuntu from the 5.04 release onwards. A longtime participant in the UK Ubuntu chatroom – where he met Canonical’s Alan Pope – Dan admits he was never that active before Snapcraft came along. It was spending time in the UK chatroom around 2016 that he discovered snaps which piqued his interest. “I saw the movement of changing Clicks to snaps and thought it was an interesting idea. It’s more widely focused than a mobile app delivery system and I’ve always liked things that also worked on the server, IoT and elsewhere” Dan comments. With a previous desire to get into mobile app development and seeing the move away from Ubuntu Touch, Dan was eager to see Snapcraft succeed and felt like it was something he could contribute to. Being such a regular presence in the Snapcraft forum, Dan is close to what the most commonly covered topics are and where the trends are forming. “Aside from the basics like ‘how do I build a snap?’, there are lots of discussions around documentation. Games are always a popular demand as it is entertainment which is often one of the first things adopted” adds Dan. Other observations include a natural weighting towards desktop snaps although notes Nextcloud is a nice example of a server snap. Audacity and a non-beta version of picture editing tool Gimp are among the most demanded, as well as a Git snap which Dan is working on himself. Outside of Ubuntu users, Arch is the most vocal alternative Linux distro present in the forum. Dan is also in the perfect position to identify himself and also gather opinion on what’s good and what could be good additions to the snap world. Initially, the idea of a transactional update system outside of the standard distro release process was an appeal personally. Allowing snaps to define their own interfaces on a per snap basis along the lines of how a non-auto connected interface, where store admins vote whether it is acceptable, would be an interesting addition to consider according to Dan. Arbitrary interfaces will allow snap developers to move faster than the current fixed interfaces allow by being able to define own confinement rules. The store admin vote requirement will retain security by denying inappropriate land-grab interfaces. Dan believes people can come to the format with pre-conceived ideas which tend not to be accurate. “We need to show it is easy, although there are always steps to make it easier. The Canonical team are aware that documentation improvements could be made” says Dan. The onboarding process has seen improvement in Dan’s eyes highlighted by the Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in programmes where dozens of participants quickly got snaps out the door. With that in mind, what is the main piece of advice he would give to someone investigating snaps for the first time? “If you’re running Ubuntu, then running ‘snap install chromium’ is an easy start and gets you a full web browser that works out the box” Dan states. The last few weeks has seen some significant snap additions with Spotify, Skype and Slack all joining the store which sets the snaps ecosystem up nicely for the year ahead. Dan highlights the importance of these three; “Attracting these big corporations will light the way for others. They’ve clearly seen snaps can enable them to target as much of the Linux eco-system in one go as possible. As well as showcasing a commercial product is viable as a snap, it could also encourage some that haven’t bothered with Linux in the past to reconsider.” The store presence is key to the adoption and discoverability of all snaps. Dan has seen the Spotify snap go from strength to strength following the promotion capabilities in the GNOME software centre – while noting it’s just as important for smaller developers who may not have the same resource. Another subtle benefit is the simple fact that people like stores as it provides a sense of gatekeeping to prevent ‘nasty stuff’ appearing. Dan further embedded himself within the Snapcraft world by joining the recent Snapcraft Summit in Seattle. Despite being one of the most regular contributors in the Snapcraft community, this week-long event helped Dan understand other use cases for snaps that he hadn’t anticipated. Summing up the event, Dan concludes, “It was great to get to know everyone in one room face to face. I’d love to see more of them occur. To be invited, I feel valued, I really do.” [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
In no particular order: There was another "partial government shutdown" of the federal government of the United States of America last Thursday. As a federal civil servant, I still rated an "essential-excepted" designation which required working ... [More] without pay until the end of the crisis. President Trump could have solved the matter if anybody could have rousted him from bed at 0940Z on February 9th. That didn't happen. We had a "technical" shutdown that lasted two hours at the start of the working day with resolution at roughly 1300Z on February 9th. A good chunk of staff "technically" did not bothering to show up for duty when it was required and escaped any consequences. Except for the Department of Defense, the remainder of the federal government of the United States of America remains without full-year appropriations for Fiscal Year 2018 which started on October 1, 2017. Appropriations are set to lapse once again on March 22, 2018. I've been given provisional approval for a vacation day on March 23rd but if we have another government shutdown that would be revoked and I would have to report to duty as "essential-excepted" personnel. Under current command guidance that designation lapses as of 0400Z on April 18, 2018. Chances remain pretty high this will happen again. Donations are always accepted via PayPal although they are totally not tax-deductible. I've been trying to broaden the scope of the Domestic Mission Field Activity at West Avenue Church of Christ a bit. One area of interest is moving beyond just the outreach to one of the local nursing homes where we've been the main spiritual link for some of the residents for the past several months regardless of the denomination they're normally part of. Fortunately I'm not alone in conducting the Activity's functions. I'm open to considering proposed transitions from the federal civil service and the data on LinkedIn is probably a good starting point if anybody wants to talk. My current job puts me at the forefront of seeing broken and shattered lives while I try to both protect the federal government's financial interests and also help meet the needs of callers. A change is needed. There is a limit to how much misery and suffering you end up seeing that you cannot help alleviate. The house is still standing. We haven't lost anything due to wintry weather. With luck we'll be able to mount on top of the roof of the garage the VHF/UHF aerial that is currently mounted inside the garage to the bottom of the roof. Being away for 12 hours per day for work plus commute time leaves little time for Xubuntu let alone Ubuntu MATE unless I give up sleeping. This long of a commute is a problem. I am looking at edX MicroMasters as ways to jumpstart picking up the second graduate degree to be able to teach at the community college level. Beyond that, there is a program from Bowling Green State University as well as one at Thomas Edison State University in New Jersey and something at the Holden University Center if I am not feeling daring. I have one earned master's so an organized program leading to an accredited award from a US institution bearing at least 18 semester hours of postgraduate-level credit is the minimum sought. Things are looking up. This year has gotten off to a rocky start. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
Storage Made Easy (SME) today announced the availability of the Storage Made Easy Enterprise File Fabric charm through Canonical’s Juju charm store. The store provides access to a wide range of best practice solutions which can be deployed to public ... [More] clouds such as AWS, Google Cloud and Azure as well as private clouds such as MAAS, OpenStack and VSphere. Now operations teams have ready access to the Storage Made Easy data store unification and governance technology which can be deployed in minutes to the cloud of their choice. Canonical’s model-driven operations system Juju addresses the complexity of modern software by providing reusable, abstracted operations across hybrid cloud and physical infrastructure. Integration points and operations are encoded in “charms” by vendors and the community of experts familiar with an app. These charms are leveraged by operations teams, configuration as code that evolves along with the software itself. The Storage Made Easy Enterprise File Fabric solution provides a governance hub for on-premises and on-cloud data stores enabling common policies and restrictions to be set across the fabric of a company’s corporate data assets. “Storage Made Easy’s participation in the Charm Partner Program and the release of our own Juju charm aligns with our mandate to make storage easier to use and secure whether on-premises, or in private or public clouds. This is an important milestone in our partnership with Canonical offering solutions that help customers deploy their applications quickly, securely and at scale,” said Steven Sweeting, Director Product Management. “We’re also pleased to support JAAS – Juju-as a Service for even faster deployment”. “We are delighted to welcome Storage Made Easy to the Juju ecosystem” said Arturo Suarez, Program Director at Canonical. “SME’s Enterprise File Fabric adds a set of outstanding features to our catalogue of storage solutions, doubling down on our commitment to offer our customers flexibility, security and the economics to run their applications at scale across different platforms.” [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
I would like to thank Brian Mullan for sharing his notes on getting X2Go to work on LXD containers. Prior to this, I never used X2Go before. You would typically use LXD (pronounced LexDee) containers to run server software. However, you can also run GUI apps. If the LXD containers are located on your desktop … Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago
After the initial release of Plasma 5.12 was made available for Artful 17.10 via our backports PPA last week, we are pleased to say the the PPA has now been updated to the 1st bugfix release 5.12.1. The full changelog for 5.12.1 can be found here. ... [More] Including fixes and polish for Discover and the desktop. Also included is an update to the latest KDE Frameworks 5.43. Upgrade instructions and caveats are as per last week’s blog post, which can be found here. The Kubuntu team wishes users a happy experience with the excellent 5.12 LTS desktop, and thanks the KDE/Plasma team for such a wonderful desktop to package. [Less]
Posted 5 days ago
Hello MAASters! I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.4.0 alpha 1 and python-libmaas 0.6.0 have now been released and are available for Ubuntu Bionic. MAAS Availability MAAS 2.4.0 alpha 1 is available in the Bionic -proposed archive or in the following ... [More] PPA: ppa:maas/next   Python-libmaas Availability Libmaas is available in the Ubuntu Bionic archive or you can download the source from: https://github.com/maas/python-libmaas/releases MAAS 2.4.0 (alpha1) Important announcements Dependency on tgt (iSCSI) has now been dropped Starting from MAAS 2.3, the way run ephemeral environments and perform deployments was changed away from using iSCSI. Instead, we introduced the ability to do the same using a squashfs image. With that, we completely removed the requirement for having tgt at all, but we didn’t drop the dependency in 2.3. As of 2.4, however, tgt has now been completely removed. Dependency on apache2 has now been dropped in the debian packages Starting from MAAS 2.0, MAAS now made the UI available in port 5240 and deprecated the use of port 80. However, as a mechanism to not break users when upgrading from the previous LTS, MAAS continued to have apache2 as a dependency to provide a reverse proxy to allow users to connect via port 80. However, the MAAS snap changed that behavior no longer providing access to MAAS via port 80. In order to keep MAAS consistent with the snap, starting from MAAS 2.4, the debian package no longer depends on apache2 to provide a reverse proxy capability from port 80. Python libmaas (0.6.0) now available in the Ubuntu Archive I’m happy to announce that the new MAAS Client Library is now available in the Ubuntu Archives for Bionic. Libmaas is an asyncio based client library that provides a nice interface to interact with MAAS. More details below. New Features & Improvements Machine Locking MAAS now adds the ability to lock machines, which prevents the user from performing actions on machines that could change their state. This gives MAAS a prevention mechanism of potentially catastrophic actions. For example, it will prevent mistakenly powering off machines or mistanly releasing machines that could bring workloads down. Audit logging MAAS 2.4 now allows the administrators to audit the user’s actions, with the introduction of audit logging. The audit logs are available to administrators via the MAAS CLI/API, giving administrators a centralized location to access these logs. Documentation is in the process of being published. For raw access please refer to the following link: https://github.com/CanonicalLtd/maas-docs/pull/766/commits/eb05fb5efa42ba850446a21ca0d55cf34ced2f5d Commissioning Harness – Supporting firmware upgrade and hardware specific scripts The commissioning harness has been expanded with various improvements to help administrators write their own firmware upgrade and hardware specific scripts. These improvements addresses various of the challenges administrators face when performing such tasks at scale. The improvements include: Ability to auto-select all the firmware upgrade/storage hardware changes (API only, UI will be available soon) Ability to run scripts only for the hardware they are intended to run on. Ability to reboot the machine while on the commissioning environment without disrupting the commissioning process. This allows administrators to: Create a hardware specific by declaring in which machine it needs to be run, by specifying the hardware specific PCI ID, modalias, vendor or model of the machine or device. Create firmware upgrade scripts that require a reboot before the machine finishes the commissioning process, by allowing to describe this in the script’s metadata. Allows administrators to define where the script can obtain proprietary firmware and/or proprietary tools to perform any of the operations required. Minor improvements – Gather information about BIOS & firmware MAAS now gathers more information about the underlying system, such as the Model, Serial, BIOS and firmware information of a machine (where available). It also gathers the information for storage devices as well as network interfaces. MAAS Client Library (python-libmaas) New upstream release – 0.6.0 A new upstream release is now available in the Ubuntu Archive for Bionic. The new release includes the following changes: Add/read/update/delete storage devices attached to machines. Configure partitions and mount points Configure Bcache Configure RAID Configure LVM Known issues & work arounds LP: #1748712  – 2.4.0a1 upgrade failed with old node event data It has been reported that an upgrade to MAAS 2.4.0a1 failed due to having old data from a non-existent know stored in the database. This could have been due to a older devel version of MAAS which would have left an entry in the node event table. A work around is provided in the bug report. If you hit this issue, please update the bug report immediately so MAAS developers. Bug fixes Please refer to the following for all bug fixes in this release. https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.4.0alpha1 [Less]
Posted 5 days ago
Somebody recently shared this with me, this is what happens when you attempt to access Parship, an online dating site, from the anonymous Tor Browser. Experian is basically a private spy agency. Their website boasts about how they can: Know who ... [More] your customers are regardless of channel or device Know where and how to reach your customers with optimal messages Create and deliver exceptional experiences every time Is that third objective, an "exceptional experience", what you were hoping for with their dating site honey trap? You are out of luck: you are not the customer, you are the product. When the Berlin wall came down, people were horrified at what they found in the archives of the Stasi. Don't companies like Experian and Facebook gather far more data than this? So can you succeed with online dating? There are only three strategies that are worth mentioning: Access sites you can't trust (which includes all dating sites, whether free or paid for) using anonymous services like Tor Browser and anonymous email addresses. Use fake photos and fake all other data. Don't send your real phone number through the messaging or chat facility in any of these sites because they can use that to match your anonymous account to a real identity: instead, get an extra SIM card that you pay for and top-up with cash. One person told me they tried this for a month as an experiment, expediently cutting and pasting a message to each contact to arrange a meeting for coffee. At each date they would give the other person a card that apologized for their completely fake profile photos and offering to start over now they could communicate beyond the prying eyes of the corporation. Join online communities that are not primarily about dating and if a relationship comes naturally, it is a bonus. If you really care about your future partner and don't want your photo to be a piece of bait used to exploit and oppress them, why not expand your real-world activities? [Less]