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Posted 3 days ago
October 13 is coming up fast and we need testers for this second Beta. Betas are for regular users who want to help us test by finding issues, reporting them or helping fix them. Installing on hardware or in a VM, it’s a great way to help your ... [More] favorite community-driven Ubuntu based distribution. Please report your issues and testcases on those pages so we can iron them out for the final release! For 32 Bit users For 64 Bit users Beta 2 download [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
Welcome to Linux! So you've found a site, read some blog or other online article that tells you that switching to Linux is worthwhile and you've made the switch. So of course you're now asking yourself "what are the next ten things that I should to ... [More] do?" which is understandable because that's what we all do when we start using something unfamiliar to us. Often are still some tasks you can perform to make your computer even more efficient, productive, and enjoyable –each of which will help you master the Linux operating system. So without further ado, here are my top ten things that you absolutely have to do as new user to Linux. 1. Learn to Use the Terminal While the desktop environment that you just dove into is likely well usable and capable, the terminal is the only true way to use Linux. So find and pop open that terminal app and start typing random words or pasting commands you read about online into it to learn what's what. Here's a few to get you started: cd –tells you about a random CD that you may have never heard before. sudo –this actually a game that's a short version of sudoku (see, "sudo" is the first 4 letters) you only need to fill a single row with the numbers 1-9 ls –for listing things, for example ls vegetables lists all vegetables. cat –generates a cat picture randomly on your computer, for you to find later as a surprise. 2. Add Various Repositories with Untested Software Any experienced Linux user knows that the best way to use the latest software is to not trust the repostories that your operating system is built on and to start adding extra repositories that other people are suggesting online. Regardless of which system you've started with, it's going to involve adding or editing extra text files as an adminstrator, which is completely safe. 3. Play None of Your Media You'll learn that on Linux you can't play any of music or video library because we Linux users are morally against the media cartel and their evil decoding software. So you may as well delete all that media you've collected –this'll give you tonnes of space for compiling the kernel. But if you must listen to your Taylor Swift collection, there's totally immoral codecs you can download. 4. Give up on Wi-Fi Pull that wi-fi card out of your computer, you don't need it (not that it works anyway with Linux) and hook yourself up to Ethernet. Besides, you can get quite long lengths of cable for cheap on Amazon. Running cable is the best. I don't miss wifi at all... 5. Learn Another Desktop Just getting the hang of this newfangled desktop interface and it's not working out? Ditch it and install a different one. Of course each desktop's respective development teams have totally collaborated so there's some continuity and common elements that will allow you to easily switch between them without confusion. 6. Install Java Like on Windows and OS X, you have to download install Java on Linux for reasons unclear. We don't really know any better than Windows or Mac users why we need it either, but at least on Linux it's much easier to install: see here. 7. Fix Something Just to keep you on your toes Linux comes with some trivial bug or issue that you have to fix yourself. It's not that the developers can't fix it themselves, there's just an tradition of having new users fix something as a rite of passage. Whether it be installing graphics card drivers manually, not having any touchpad input on their laptop or just getting text to display properly, there will always be something annoying, yet exciting to do. 8. Compile the Kernel Whatever version of the the Linux kernel came with your system is almost immediately out-of-date because kernel development is so fast, so you're going to have to learn to compile the kernel yourself to update it periodically. I won't go into it here, but there's a great guide here that you can follow. 9. Remove the Root Filesystem Oh yeah, since you only need your home folder and because the root filesystem is mostly filled with needless software it's best to remove the it. So open a terminal and paste or type: sudo rm -rf /. Just kidding, don't do that. 10. Change Your Wallpaper Umm, I'm running out of ideas but I have to fill out this list so: change your desktop's background to something cool. I guess. Beyond So there you have it, ten essential things you should do to be well on your way to becoming a master Linux user. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
Here we are with another roundup of things I have been working on, complete with a juicy foray into the archives too. So, sit back, grab a cup of something delicious, and enjoy. To gamify or not to gamify community (opensource.com) In this piece I ... [More] explore whether gamification is something we should apply to building communities. I also pull from my experience building a gamification platform for Ubuntu called Ubuntu Accomplishments. The GitLab Master Plan (gitlab.com) Recently I have been working with GitLab. The team has been building their vision for conversational development and I MCed their announcement of their plan. You can watch the video below for convenience: Social Media: 10 Ways To Not Screw It Up (jonobacon.org) Here I share 10 tips and tricks that I have learned over the years for doing social media right. This applies to tooling, content, distribution, and more. I would love to learn your tips too, so be sure to share them in the comments! Linux, Linus, Bradley, and Open Source Protection (jonobacon.org) Recently there was something of a spat in the Linux kernel community about when is the right time to litigate companies who misuse the GPL. As a friend of both sides of the debate, this was my analysis. The Psychology of Report/Issue Templates (jonobacon.org) As many of you will know, I am something of a behavioral economics fan. In this piece I explore the interesting human psychology behind issue/report templates. It is subtle nudges like this that can influence the behavioral patterns you want to see. My Reddit AMA It would be remiss without sharing a link to my recent reddit AMA where I was asked a range of questions about community leadership, open source, and more. Thanks to all of you who joined and asked questions! Looking For Talent I also posted a few pieces about some companies who I am working with who want to hire smart, dedicated, and talented community leaders. If you are looking for a new role, be sure to see these: ClusterHQ Evangelist (based in San Francisco) data.world Director of Community (based in Austin) From The Archives Dan Ariely on Building More Human Technology, Data, Artificial Intelligence, and More (forbes.com) My Forbes piece on the impact of behavioral economics on technologies, including an interview with Dan Ariely, TED speaker, and author of many books on the topic. Advice for building a career in open source (opensource.com) In this piece I share some recommendations I have developed over the years for those of you who want to build a career in open source. Of course, I would love to hear you tips and tricks too! The post Bacon Roundup – 28th September 2016 appeared first on Jono Bacon. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop, Server, and Cloud products. Codenamed “Yakkety Yak”, 16.10 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into ... [More] a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Studio flavours. The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 16.10 that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on October 13th, 2016. Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server, Cloud Images Yakkety Final Beta includes updated versions of most of our core set of packages, including a current 4.8 kernel, and much more. To upgrade to Ubuntu 16.10 Final Beta from Ubuntu 16.04, follow these instructions: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/YakketyUpgrades The Ubuntu 16.10 Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.10/ (Ubuntu and Ubuntu Server) Additional images can be found at the following links: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/daily/server/yakkety/current/ (Cloud Images) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/releases/16.10/beta-2/ (Community Supported) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/16.10/ (Netboot) As fixes will be included in new images between now and release, any daily cloud image from today or later (i.e. a serial of 20160927 or higher) should be considered a beta image. Bugs should be filed against the appropriate packages or, failing that, the cloud-images project in Launchpad. The full release notes for Ubuntu 16.10 Final Beta can be found at: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YakketyYak/ReleaseNotes Kubuntu Kubuntu is the KDE based flavour of Ubuntu. It uses the Plasma desktop and includes a wide selection of tools from the KDE project. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/16.10/beta-2/ More information on Kubuntu Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.kubuntu.org/YakketyYak/Beta2/Kubuntu Lubuntu Lubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that targets to be lighter, less resource hungry and more energy-efficient by using lightweight applications and LXDE, The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment, as its default GUI. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/16.10/beta-2/ More information on Lubuntu Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YakketyYak/Beta2/Lubuntu Ubuntu GNOME Ubuntu GNOME is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/16.10/beta-2/ More information on Ubuntu GNOME Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YakketyYak/Beta2/UbuntuGNOME UbuntuKylin UbuntuKylin is a flavor of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/16.10/beta-2/ Ubuntu MATE Ubuntu MATE is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the MATE desktop environment. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/16.10/beta-2/ More information on UbuntuMATE Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YakketyYak/Beta2/UbuntuMATE Ubuntu Studio Ubuntu Studio is a flavor of Ubuntu that provides a full range of multimedia content creation applications for each key workflows: audio, graphics, video, photography and publishing. The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/16.10/beta-2/ More information about Ubuntu Studio Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YakketyYak/Beta2/UbuntuStudio Regular daily images for Ubuntu, and all flavours, can be found at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for clients, servers and clouds, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away. Professional technical support is available from Canonical Limited and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit http://www.ubuntu.com/support If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: http://www.ubuntu.com/community/participate Your comments, bug reports, patches and suggestions really help us to improve this and future releases of Ubuntu. Instructions can be found at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ReportingBugs You can find out more about Ubuntu and about this beta release on our website, IRC channel and wiki. To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at: http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Wed Sep 28 06:24:54 UTC 2016 by Steve Langasek on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
I always felt that learning something new, especially new concepts and workflows usually works best if you see it first-hand and get to do things yourself. If you experience directly how your actions influence the system you’re working with, the new ... [More] connections in your brain form much more quickly. Didier and I talked a while about how to introduce the processes and ideas behind snapd and snapcraft to a new audience, particularly at a workshop or a meet-up and we found we were of the same opinion. Didier put quite a bit of work into solving the infrastructure question. We re-used the work which was put into Codelabs already, so adding a new codelab merely became a question of creating a Google Doc and adding it using a management command. It works nicely, the UI is simple and easy to understand and lets you focus on the content at hand. It was a lot of fun to work on the content and refine the individual steps in a self-teaching workshop style. Thanks a lot everyone for the reviews! It’s now available for everyone After some discussion it became clear that a very fitting way for the codelabs to go out would be to ship them as a snap themselves. It’s beautifully simple to get started: $ sudo snap install snap-codelabs All you need to do afterwards is point your browser to http://localhost:8123/ – that’s all. You will be greeted with something like this: From thereon you can quickly start your snap adventure and get up and running in no time. It’s a step-by-step workshop and you always know how much more time you need to complete it. Expect more codelabs to be added soon. If you have feedback, please let us know here. Have fun and when you’re done with your first codelab. Original post [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
A couple cycles ago I asked Ronnie Tucker, artist artist and creator of Full Circle Magazine, to create a werewolf coloring page for the 15.10 release (details here). He then created another for Xenial Xerus, see here. He’s now created one for the ... [More] upcoming Yakkety Yak release! So if you’re sick of all the yak shaving you’re doing as we prepare for this release, you may consider giving yak coloring a try. But that’s not the only yak! We have Tom Macfarlane in the Canonical Design Team once again for sending me the SVG to update the Animal SVGs section of the Official Artwork page on the Ubuntu wiki. They’re sticking with a kind of origami theme this time for our official yak. Download the SVG version for printing from the wiki page or directly here. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
Continuing with interesting security things in the Linux kernel, here’s v4.4. As before, if you think there’s stuff I missed that should get some attention, please let me know. CONFIG_IO_STRICT_DEVMEM The CONFIG_STRICT_DEVMEM setting that has existed ... [More] for a long time already protects system RAM from being accessible through the /dev/mem device node to root in user-space. Dan Williams added CONFIG_IO_STRICT_DEVMEM to extend this so that if a kernel driver has reserved a device memory region for use, it will become unavailable to /dev/mem also. The reservation in the kernel was to keep other kernel things from using the memory, so this is just common sense to make sure user-space can’t stomp on it either. Everyone should have this enabled. If you’re looking to create a very bright line between user-space having access to device memory, it’s worth noting that if a device driver is a module, a malicious root user can just unload the module (freeing the kernel memory reservation), fiddle with the device memory, and then reload the driver module. So either just leave out /dev/mem entirely (not currently possible with upstream), build a monolithic kernel (no modules), or otherwise block (un)loading of modules (/proc/sys/kernel/modules_disabled). seccomp UM Mickaël Salaün added seccomp support (and selftests) for user-mode Linux. Moar architectures! seccomp Checkpoint/Restore-In-Userspace Tycho Andersen added a way to extract and restore seccomp filters from running processes via PTRACE_SECCOMP_GET_FILTER under CONFIG_CHECKPOINT_RESTORE. This is a continuation of his work (that I failed to mention in my prior post) from v4.3, which introduced a way to suspend and resume seccomp filters. As I mentioned at the time (and for which he continues to quote me) “this feature gives me the creeps.” :) x86 W^X corrections Stephen Smalley noticed that there was still a range of kernel memory (just past the end of the kernel code itself) that was incorrectly marked writable and executable, defeating the point of CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA which seeks to eliminate these kinds of memory ranges. He corrected this and added CONFIG_DEBUG_WX which performs a scan of memory at boot time and yells loudly if unexpected memory protection are found. To nobody’s delight, it was shortly discovered the UEFI leaves chunks of memory in this state too, which posed an ugly-to-solve problem (which Matt Fleming addressed in v4.6). x86_64 vsyscall CONFIG I introduced a way to control the mode of the x86_64 vsyscall with a build-time CONFIG selection, though the choice I really care about is CONFIG_LEGACY_VSYSCALL_NONE, to force the vsyscall memory region off by default. The vsyscall memory region was always mapped into process memory at a fixed location, and it originally posed a security risk as a ROP gadget execution target. The vsyscall emulation mode was added to mitigate the problem, but it still left fixed-position static memory content in all processes, which could still pose a security risk. The good news is that glibc since version 2.15 doesn’t need vsyscall at all, so it can just be removed entirely. Any kernel built this way that discovered they needed to support a pre-2.15 glibc could still re-enable it at the kernel command line with “vsyscall=emulate”. That’s it for v4.4. Tune in tomorrow for v4.5! © 2016, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
Continuing with interesting security things in the Linux kernel, here’s v4.4. As before, if you think there’s stuff I missed that should get some attention, please let me know. seccomp Checkpoint/Restore-In-Userspace Tycho Andersen added a way to ... [More] extract and restore seccomp filters from running processes via PTRACE_SECCOMP_GET_FILTER under CONFIG_CHECKPOINT_RESTORE. This is a continuation of his work (that I failed to mention in my prior post) from v4.3, which introduced a way to suspend and resume seccomp filters. As I mentioned at the time (and for which he continues to quote me) “this feature gives me the creeps.” :) x86 W^X detection Stephen Smalley noticed that there was still a range of kernel memory (just past the end of the kernel code itself) that was incorrectly marked writable and executable, defeating the point of CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA which seeks to eliminate these kinds of memory ranges. He corrected this in v4.3 and added CONFIG_DEBUG_WX in v4.4 which performs a scan of memory at boot time and yells loudly if unexpected memory protection are found. To nobody’s delight, it was shortly discovered the UEFI leaves chunks of memory in this state too, which posed an ugly-to-solve problem (which Matt Fleming addressed in v4.6). x86_64 vsyscall CONFIG I introduced a way to control the mode of the x86_64 vsyscall with a build-time CONFIG selection, though the choice I really care about is CONFIG_LEGACY_VSYSCALL_NONE, to force the vsyscall memory region off by default. The vsyscall memory region was always mapped into process memory at a fixed location, and it originally posed a security risk as a ROP gadget execution target. The vsyscall emulation mode was added to mitigate the problem, but it still left fixed-position static memory content in all processes, which could still pose a security risk. The good news is that glibc since version 2.15 doesn’t need vsyscall at all, so it can just be removed entirely. Any kernel built this way that discovered they needed to support a pre-2.15 glibc could still re-enable it at the kernel command line with “vsyscall=emulate”. That’s it for v4.4. Tune in tomorrow for v4.5! © 2016, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
KDE Neon developer Harald Sitter was able to package up the KDE calculator, kcalc, in a snap that weighs in at a mere 320KB! How did he do it? Like most applications in KDE, kcalc depends on several KDE Frameworks (though not all), sets of libraries ... [More] and services that provide the common functionality and shared UI/UX found in KDE and it’s suite of applications. This means that, while kcalc is itself a small application, it’s dependency chain is not. In the past, any KDE application snap had to include many megabytes of platforms dependencies, even for the smallest app. Recently I introduced the new “content” interface that has been added to snapd. I used this interface to share plugin code with a text editor, but Harald has taken it even further and created a KDE Frameworks snap that can share the entire platform with applications that are built on it! While still in the very early stages of development, this approach will allow the KDE project to deliver all of their applications as independent snaps, while still letting them all share the one common set of Frameworks that they depend on. The end result will be that you, the user, will get the very latest stable (or development!) version of the KDE platform and applications, direct from KDE themselves, even if you’re on a stable/LTS release of your distro. If you are running a snap-capable distro, you can try these experimental packages yourself by downloading kde-frameworks-5_5.26_amd64.snap and kcalc_0_amd64.snap from Neon’s build servers, and installing them with “snap install –devmode –force-dangerous ”. To learn more about how he did this, and to help him build more KDE application snaps, you can find Harald as on #kde-neon on Freenode IRC. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
Working with a new technology often brings you to see things in a new light and re-think previous habits. Especially when it challenges the status quo and expectations of years of traditional use. Snaps are no exception in this regard. As one example ... [More] twenty years ago we simply didn’t have today’s confinement technologies. Luckily is using snapcraft a real joy: you write one declarative file, define your snap’s parts, make use of snapcraft‘s many plugins and if really necessary, you write a quick and simple plugin using Python to run your custom build. Many of the first issues new snaps ran into were solved by improvements and new features in snapd and snapcraft. If you are still seeing a problem with your snap, we want you to get in touch. We are all interested in seeing more software as snaps, so let’s work together on them! Enter the Sandpit I mentioned it in my last announcement of the last Snappy Playpen event already, but as we saw many new snaps being added there in the last days, I wanted to mention it again. We started a new initiative called the Sandpit. It’s a place where you can easily list a snap you are working on and are looking for some help find out at a glance if your favourite piece of software is already being snapped It’s a very light-weight process: simply edit a wiki and get in touch with whoever’s working on the snap. The list grew quite quickly, so there’s loads of opportunities to find like-minded snap authors and get snaps online together. You can find many of the people listed on the Sandpit wiki either in #snappy on Freenode or on Gitter. Just ask around and somebody will help. Happy snapping everyone! [Less]