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Posted 5 days ago
It’s harder to find news these days. On the one hand, there’s news everywhere you turn. Shrieking at you. On the other, we’re each in a bubble. Articles are rushed out to get clicks; everything’s got a political slant in one direction or another. ... [More] This is not new. But it does feel like it’s getting worse. It’s being recognised, though. Buzzfeed have just launched a thing called “Outside Your Bubble“, an admirable effort to “give our audience a glimpse at what’s happening outside their own social media spaces”; basically, it’s a list of links to views for and against at the bottom of certain articles. Boris Smus just wrote up an idea to add easily-digestible sparkline graphs to news articles which provide context to the numbers quoted. There have long been services like Channel 4’s FactCheck and AllSides which try to correct errors in published articles or give a balanced view of the news. Matt Kiser’s WTF Just Happened Today tries to summarise, and there are others. (Aside: I am bloody sure that there’s an xkcd or similar about the idea of the quiet voice, where when someone uses a statistic on telly, the quiet voice says “that’s actually only 2% higher than it was under the last president” or something. But I cannot for the life of me find it. Help.) So here’s what I’d like. I want a thing I can install. A browser extension or something. And when I view an article, I get context and viewpoint on it. If the article says “Trump’s approval rating is 38%”, the extension highlights it and says “other sources say it’s 45% (link)” and “here’s a list of other presidents’ approval ratings at this point in their terms” and “here’s a link to an argument on why it’s this number”. When the article says “the UK doesn’t have enough trade negotiators to set up trade deals” there’s a link to an article claiming that that isn’t a problem and explaining why. If it says “NHS wait times are now longer than they’ve ever been” there’s a graph showing what this response times are, and linking to a study showing that NHS funding is dropping faster than response times are. An article saying that X billion is spent on foreign aid gets a note on how much that costs each taxpayer, what proportion of the budget it is, how much people think it is. It provides context, views from outside your bubble, left and right. You get to see what other people think of this and how they contextualise it; you get to see what quoted numbers mean and understand the background. It’s not political one way or the other; it’s like a wise aunt commentator, the quiet voice that says “OK, here’s what this means” so you’re better informed, of how it’s relevant to you and what people outside your bubble think. Now, here’s why it won’t work. It won’t work because it’s a hysterical amount of effort and nobody has a motive to do it. It has to be almost instant; there’s little point in brilliantly annotating an article three days after it’s written when everyone’s already read it. It’d be really difficult for it to be non-partisan, and it’d be even more difficult to make people believe it was non-partisan even if it was. There’s no money in it — it’s explicitly not a thing that people go to, but lives on other people’s sites. And there aren’t browser extensions on mobile. The Washington Post offer something like this with their service to annotate Trump’s tweets, but extending it to all news articles everywhere is a huge amount of work. Organisations with a remit to do this sort of thing — the newly-spun-off Open News from Mozilla and the Knight Foundation, say — don’t have the resources to do anything even approaching this. And it’s no good if you have to pay for it. People don’t really want opposing views, thoughts from outside their bubble, graphs and context; that’s what’s caused this thing to need to exist in the first place! So it has to be trivial to add; if you demand money nobody will buy it. So I can’t see how you pay the army of fact checkers and linkers your need to run this. It can’t be crowd sourced; if it were then it wouldn’t be a reliable annotation source, it’d be reddit, which would be disastrous. But it’d be so useful. And once it exists they can produce a thing which generates printable PDF annotations and I can staple them inside my parents copy of the Daily Mail. [Less]
Posted 5 days ago
From the “I should have posted this months ago” vault… When I led technology development at One Laptop per Child Australia, I maintained two golden rules: everything that we release must ‘just work’ from the perspective of the user (usually a child ... [More] or teacher), and no special technical expertise should ever be required to set-up, use or maintain the technology. In large part, I believe that we were successful. Once the more obvious challenges have been identified and cleared, some more fundamental problems become evident. Our goal was to improve educational opportunities for children as young as possible, but proficiently using computers to input information can require a degree of literacy. Sugar Labs have done stellar work in questioning the relevance of the desktop metaphor for education, and in coming up with a more suitable alternative. This proved to be a remarkable platform for developing a touch-screen laptop, in the form of the XO-4 Touch: the icons-based user interface meant that we could add touch capabilities with relatively few user-visible tweaks. The screen can be swivelled and closed over the keyboard as with previous models, meaning that this new version can be easily converted into a pure tablet at will. Revisiting Our Assumptions Still, a fundamental assumption has long gone unchallenged on all computers: the default typeface and keyboard. It doesn’t at all represent how young children learn the English alphabet or literacy. Moreover, at OLPC Australia we were often dealing with children who were behind on learning outcomes, and who were attending school with almost no exposure to English (since they speak other languages at home). How are they supposed to learn the curriculum when they can barely communicate in the classroom? Looking at a standard PC keyboard, you’ll see that the keys are printed with upper-case letters. And yet, that is not how letters are taught in Australian schools. Imagine that you’re a child who still hasn’t grasped his/her ABCs. You see a keyboard full of unfamiliar symbols. You press one, and on the screen pops up a completely different looking letter! The keyboard may be in upper-case, but by default you’ll get the lower-case variants on the screen. A standard PC keyboard Unfortunately, the most prevalent touch-screen keyboard on the marke isn’t any better. Given the large education market for its parent company, I’m astounded that this has not been a priority. The Apple iOS keyboard Better alternatives exist on other platforms, but I still was not satisfied. A Re-Think The solution required an examination of how children learn, and the challenges that they often face when doing so. The end result is simple, yet effective. The standard OLPC XO mechanical keyboard (above) versus the OLPC Australia Literacy keyboard (below) This image contrasts the standard OLPC mechanical keyboard with the OLPC Australia Literacy keyboard that we developed. Getting there required several considerations: a new typeface, optimised for literacy a cleaner design, omitting characters that are not common in English (they can still be entered with the AltGr key) an emphasis on lower-case upper-case letters printed on the same keys, with the Shift arrow angled to indicate the relationship better use of symbols to aid instruction One interesting user story with the old keyboard that I came across was in a remote Australian school, where Aboriginal children were trying to play the Maze activity by pressing the opposite arrows that they were supposed to. Apparently they thought that the arrows represented birds’ feet! You’ll see that we changed the arrow heads on the literacy keyboard as a result. We explicitly chose not to change the QWERTY layout. That’s a different debate for another time. The Typeface The abc123 typeface is largely the result of work I did with John Greatorex. It is freely downloadable (in TrueType and FontForge formats) and open source. After much research and discussions with educators, I was unimpressed with the other literacy-oriented fonts available online. Characters like ‘a’ and ‘9’ (just to mention a couple) are not rendered in the way that children are taught to write them. Young children are also susceptible to confusion over letters that look similar, including mirror-images of letters. We worked to differentiate, for instance, the lower-case L from the upper-case i, and the lower-case p from the lower-case q. Typography is a wonderfully complex intersection of art and science, and it would have been foolhardy for us to have started from scratch. We used as our base the high-quality DejaVu Sans typeface. This gave us a foundation that worked well on screen and in print. Importantly for us, it maintained legibility at small point sizes on the 200dpi XO display. On the Screen abc123 is a suitable substitute for DejaVu Sans. I have been using it as the default user interface font in Ubuntu for over a year. It looks great in Sugar as well. The letters are crisp and easy to differentiate, even at small point sizes. We made abc123 the default font for both the user interface and in activities (applications). The abc123 font in Sugar’s Write activity, on an XO laptop screen Likewise, the touch-screen keyboard is clear and simple to use. The abc123 font on the XO touch-screen keyboard, on an XO laptop screen The end result is a more consistent literacy experience across the whole device. What you press on the hardware or touch-screen keyboard will be reproduced exactly on the screen. What you see on the user interface is also what you see on the keyboards. [Less]
Posted 6 days ago
The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support. Like previous LTS series’, 16.04.2 includes hardware ... [More] enablement stacks for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures except for 32-bit powerpc, and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images. Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel, however you may select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader. As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Kubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, Xubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, Mythbuntu 16.04.2 LTS, Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.2 LTS, Lubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, Ubuntu Kylin 16.04.2 LTS, Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS and Ubuntu Studio 16.04.2 LTS are also now available. More details can be found in their individual release notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Base, and Ubuntu Kylin. All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years. To get Ubuntu 16.04.2 In order to download Ubuntu 16.04.2, visit: http://www.ubuntu.com/download Users of Ubuntu 14.04 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 16.04.2 via Update Manager. For further information about upgrading, see: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/XenialUpgrades As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge. We recommend that all users read the 16.04.1 release notes, which document caveats and workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places: #ubuntu on irc.freenode.net http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users http://www.ubuntuforums.org http://askubuntu.com Help Shape Ubuntu If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: http://www.ubuntu.com/community/get-involved About Ubuntu Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, clouds and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away. Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit: http://www.ubuntu.com/support More Information You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below: http://www.ubuntu.com/ To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at: http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Fri Feb 17 01:45:12 UTC 2017 by Adam Conrad [Less]
Posted 7 days ago
You’ve probably heard a lot about Snappy and Ubuntu Core in the past couple of months. Since the whole ecosystem is slightly becoming “tryable”, let’s test an “all-snap” Ubuntu Core setup (does not support DEB packages at all!) in a virtual machine. Preparations Install QEMU: # On Ubuntu apt-get install qemu-kvm # On Arch pacman […]
Posted 7 days ago
Part 1: Setting up an “All-Snap” Ubuntu Core image in a QEMU/KVM virtual machine Part 2: Basic management of an Ubuntu Core installation Part 3: Mir and graphics on Ubuntu Core Part 4: Confinement You’ve probably heard a lot about Snappy and Ubuntu Core in the past couple of months. Since the whole ecosystem is slightly becoming “tryable”, […]
Posted 7 days ago
The second point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes. In addition, we suggest ... [More] adding the Backports PPA to update to Plasma 5.8.5. Read more about it: http://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-8-5-bugfix-release-in-xenial-and-yakkety-backports-now/ Warning: 14.04 LTS to 16.04 LTS upgrades are problematic, and should not be attempted by the average user. Please install a fresh copy of 16.04.2 instead. To prevent messages about upgrading, change Prompt=lts with Prompt=normal or Prompt=never in the /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades file. As always, make a thorough backup of your data before upgrading. See the Ubuntu 16.04.2 release announcement and Kubuntu Release Notes. Download 16.04.2 images. [Less]
Posted 7 days ago
Hello snapcrafters! We are pleased to announce the release snapcraft 2.27: https://launchpad.net/snapcraft/+milestone/2.27 Contributions This release has seen some contributions from outside of the snapcraft core team, so we want to give a shout out ... [More] to these folks, here’s a team thank you for: Colin Watson John Lenton Kit Randel Loïc Minier Marco Trevisan elespike New in this release Faster iteration This release brings in many features to speed up development and iteration, the biggest under the covers improvement is caching of stage-packages works correctly again succesive pull steps including a repeated set of stage-packages will be a breeze. The other improvment is that delta uploads are now possible, it is currenly disabled but can be toggled by a feature flag in the environment, just set DELTA_UPLOADS_EXPERIMENTAL=1 and enjoy the benefits. The tentative plan is for this to be the default in snapcraft 2.28 classic confinement Improvements have been made to the experimental classic confinement build setup to be more robust and reliable. These improvements allow to build classic confined snaps that work across a wider set of OS releases (particularly those with differing glibc versions). An early adopter of this work is conjure-up which now sports Trusty Tahr support. Learn more about conjure-up by visiting http://conjure-up.io/ python plugin The python plugin has also received some attention with regards to classic confinement. Most importantly it now does not leak any variables specific to the plugin into the environment. Another improvement that has been made is that the plugin is now capable of detecting already staged interpreter instances and use that instead of providing one itself. This allows one to choose their own interpreter (which is important for classic confined snaps until the core snap implements use of –library-path for ld). Making use of your own interpreter is really easy as it uses the common language already implemented in snapcraft (the plugin is just now smarter), here’s a snippet: parts: my-python-app: source: ... plugin: python after: [python] python: source: https://www.python.org/ftp/python/3.6.0/Python-3.6.0.tar.xz plugin: autotools configflags: [--prefix=/usr] build-packages: [libssl-dev] prime: - -usr/include And with that you get to use python 3.6.0 in your snap! CI builds Previous to snapcraft 2.27 it was not possible to build on non snapd enabled environments as the core snap needs to be available on the system where the classic confined snap is to be built. From this version onwards it should be possible to build classic confined snaps either with cleanbuild or Launchpad builders as snapcraft is hinted about the environment and sets up core accordingly. Building on other lxd remotes A simple but useful feature is offloading builds to different instances, with that in mind one can now offload cleanbuild executions onto other lxd remotes. It is as simple as snapcraft cleanbuild --remote my-remote To create my-remote just follow the setup instructions on https://linuxcontainers.org/lxd/getting-started-cli/#multiple-hosts Setting up environment No more wrapper scripts just to setup on environment entry, this is now tied into an app entry in apps. Here’s a quick example: apps: vim: command: bin/vim environment: VIMRUNTIME: $SNAP/share/vim/vim80 Releasing to channel tracks Releasing to tracks worked out of the box, this is a user experience improvement on the result one sees when trying do to so. If you are wondering what tracks are, here’s a simple explanation, they are like a Long Term Support channel added to your regular stability level channels (i.e.; stable, candidate, beta, edge), this is useful for cases where some users need to stick to a major version number such as the case of etcd where some might want to stick to 2.3 while others are happy with tracking latest (which is an implicit track). From a snap developer point of view, here’s how to push and release to edge on the 0.2 track, $ snapcraft push hello_0.3_amd64.snap --release 0.2/edge Pushing 'hello_0.3_amd64.snap' to the store. Uploading hello_0.3_amd64.snap [==============================================] 100% Ready to release! Revision 3 of 'hello' created. Arch Track Series Channel Version Revision amd64 0.2 16 stable - - candidate - - beta - - edge 0.3 3 And here’s how you would release, $ snapcraft release hello 3 0.2/beta Arch Track Series Channel Version Revision amd64 0.2 16 stable - - candidate - - beta 0.3 3 edge 0.3 3 The ‘0.2/beta’ channel is now open. Others For the full list of things available on 2.27 feel free to check https://launchpad.net/snapcraft/+milestone/2.27 Final Notes To get the source for this release check it out at https://github.com/snapcore/snapcraft/releases/tag/2.27 A great place to collaborate and discuss features, bugs and ideas on snapcraft is snapcraft@lists.snapcraft.io mailing list or on the snapcraft channel on Rocket Chat https://rocket.ubuntu.com/channel/snapcraft To file bugs, please go to https://bugs.launchpad.net/snapcraft/+filebug. Happy snapcrafting! — Sergio and the team [Less]
Posted 7 days ago by nore...@blogger.com (Dustin Kirkland)
Just another reason why LXD is so awesome...You can easily configure your own cloud-init configuration into your LXD instance profile.In my case, I want cloud-init to automatically ssh-import-id kirkland, to fetch my keys from Launchpad. ... [More]  Alternatively, I could use gh:dustinkirkland to fetch my keys from Github.Here's how!First, edit your default LXD profile (or any other, for that matter):$ lxc edit profile defaultThen, add the config snippet, like this:config: user.vendor-data: | #cloud-config users: - name: root ssh-import-id: gh:dustinkirkland shell: /bin/bashdescription: Default LXD profiledevices: eth0: name: eth0 nictype: bridged parent: lxdbr0 type: nicname: defaultSave and quit in your interactive editor, and then launch a new instance:$ lxc launch ubuntu:xCreating amazed-manateeStarting amazed-manateeFind your instance's IP address:$ lxc list+----------------+---------+----------------------+----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+| NAME | STATE | IPV4 | IPV6 | TYPE | SNAPSHOTS |+----------------+---------+----------------------+----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+| amazed-manatee | RUNNING | 10.163.22.135 (eth0) | fdce:be5e:b787:f7d2:216:3eff:fe1c:773 (eth0) | PERSISTENT | 0 |+----------------+---------+----------------------+----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+And now SSH in!$ ssh ubuntu@10.163.22.135$ ssh -6 ubuntu@fdce:be5e:b787:f7d2:216:3eff:fe1c:773Enjoy!:-Dustin [Less]
Posted 7 days ago
The telecom industry is not as buoyant as it was some years back. Telecom operators ‘ revenues are under pressure due to innovations from over the top players. Costs are spiralling out of control because of 4/5G deployments, fibre to the premise ... [More] , social networking data explosions, 4K video streaming, IoT and more. Time to market was always measured in months, not days or hours. What if all of this can be changed for the better? What if costs can be reduced exponentially? What if time to market can be expressed in minutes? What if telecom startups can help create thousands of new ideas and solutions that are generating new revenues? What if we can make telecom innovation the new “sexy” trend for 2017? Impossible? In the beginning of 2016 it looked impossible that software defined radio would be something that excited people. The collaboration between Lime Micro and Canonical changed that. The LimeSDR is the first software defined radio that can be programmed via open source apps, called snaps, that anybody can download from an app store. There are now multiple thousands of developers who have or shortly will receive their LimeSDR. They will be able to create all types of protocols and share them among the community. LTE, LoRa, Bluetooth, ZigBee and many more. Even invent their own protocols. Generation Y, the millennials, are discovering that wireless innovation is fun. To make sure these new diamonds of wireless innovation are not lost upon us, we need to provide them with a market. That market will be created via the launch of open source production-ready base stations with app stores. We really liked how the last crowdfunding campaign created a community of innovators. That is why we will after Mobile World Congress launch the first telecom production-ready hardware crowdfunding campaign, called LimeNet. Why open source the design for base stations? As stated before, telecom operators have their costs spiralling out of control. Base stations need to become dramatically cheaper because with future protocols like 5G we will have exponentially more of them. Not only the price of a base station needs to go down, but also the total cost of ownership. Everything from who deploys, maintains and supports base stations, how and where will be put into question. Why app stores on base stations? The first reason is to decide what software you want to use. We are open sourcing the hardware but we want to see both open source and commercial software compete. The value is in software defining base stations. Just like on your mobile phone, some apps will be free and others are paid for or have in-app purchases. If telecom innovators can make money by selling solutions to both telecom operators and their customers then more new revenue generating solutions will be launched. Installing these solutions via apps from an app store, makes it an easy and quick process. In minutes you can go from nothing to a working solution that automatically integrates with other apps and back-end systems. What about security and manageability? The number one Cloud operating system in the world is Ubuntu. Canonical has taken the same Ubuntu that is being used by Netflix, Uber, AirBnB, Snapchat and many others and shrunk it down to Ubuntu Core. We introduced lots of changes to make running third-party apps, called Snaps, secure and transactionally upgradeable. This means that if something goes wrong you can roll back to the previous working version. You can implement DevOps for Devices and continuously roll out new updates and functionalities in a controlled way. Any time a security issue arises, it can be easily patched. Snaps are contained, hence bugs or exploits don’t affect the other snaps or the operating system. What about telecom software? On MWC we will showcase LTE stacks from companies like Amarisoft and Eurecom/ OpenAirInterface, as well as EPC solutions from Quortus. Telecom solutions will no longer need a lengthy RFP process. You just download the Snap from the Brand Store, test it and you are ready for roll-out. Procurement of software should be based on features, quality and fit for purpose. This process should be measured in days at most. Not months or sometimes years. In a world of integrations in minutes, you will be able to change your mind. To allow everybody to be able to run a complete 4G network,  Eurecom and Canonical have enabled an open software ecosystem for 4G-ready networking powered by OpenAirInterface and Canonical model-driven NFV solution that can be deployed as network apps on any cloud and easily integrated into the new base station with a snap. Where can I get the LTE-ready open source apps? Today, OpenAirInterface develops an ecosystem for open source software/hardware development for the core network (EPC) and access-network (EUTRAN) of 3GPP cellular networks. It  offers a 5G Cellular Stack based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware that can be used as legacy packages, Juju Charms, and Ubuntu Core Snaps. Will telecom operators be the only enterprises buying and running base stations? The answer will be “definitely NOT”! We will be showcasing solutions from Telet Research and Soracom that allow others to run base stations and telecom infrastructure as well.  In a software defined world, we can make deployment of private mobile infrastructure as simple as rolling out WiFi. With the arrival of unlicensed and licensed shared access (LSA) spectrum, small cells can be remotely configured as a managed service, just as you can buy cloud compute and storage. IoT SIM cards and IoT specific value added services, capable of operating on private and existing mobile networks  will be available for purchase in quantities as small as one. Hotels and homes that currently have poor or non-existent mobile coverage  be able to guarantee perfect coverage, even if their telecom operator doesn’t.  Meeting rooms underground should have perfect coverage. Rural communities should be able to deploy their own networks. Industrial consortiums as well. Networks don’t have to be for mobile, they can be for any type of smart device. Multi Operator Neutral Host (MONeH) solutions offer a highly advantageous business model; they are quicker and less expensive to set up, yet manage to provide coverage for multiple operators in areas where conventional macro network builds simply are not cost effective or are not appropriate (such as in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty).   These solutions are not limited to just mobile services – they can also offer Fixed Wireless Broadband and 5G IoT services on the same SDR-based small cells. IoT-Ready and New Revenue Generating Soracom will showcase IoT SIMs that can go into low cost NB-IoT or LTE-M type of devices such as the 5-network FiPy from Pycom. What about using custom protocols for new types of devices. Spur is a great example of how a hotel, bank or any consumer facing business that runs their own base station could install a Spur Snap to also have immediate feedback on service quality. The traditional innovation killer: OSS integrations In a telecom world where every service needs to be integrated into billing, call centre support, inventory management, workflow management and lots of other systems, an app store which allows you to launch thousands of new services each year needs a new way of thinking as well. Supporting devices with lots of different app solutions from many vendors, requires IoT cloud native support platforms. RevTwo will be demoing theirs. The best of cloud, mobile and IoT all into one support platform. Billing has been traditionally very challenging as well, particularly at the edge of the network. Most billing systems are centralised, expensive and are hard to scale and protect from tampering. IOTA’s next-generation Blockchain solution resolves this and allows for billing systems to be build in a distributed manner in which adding more base stations makes the complete system more scalable, resilient, tamper-proof and above all: free of fees. Each base station will be part of a distributed ledger. Unlike traditional Blockchain, IOTA can do fast transaction handling without fees, endure glitchy connectivity from main net and scale, which they will demo on the booth.   Sometimes things break in a network or have to be upgraded and you will have to dispatch people or take automatic repair actions. To show you how this works the effortless Salesforce IoT Cloud integration and solutions will be demoed. What will open source base stations look like? In a software defined world the answer can be: “Totally Different”! SocialVend will be demoing what the new base stations will look like when you combine them with their vendmini™. Experience Social Telecom Vending on MWC in which a vending machine becomes a base station, provides you with SIMs, allows you to top up your balance and via an app store can do a million things more. Come and see us at MWC2017 in Hall 3 Come and see the future of wireless networks at the Ubuntu booth in Hall P3 – 3K31. Book a meeting with our executive team. [Less]
Posted 7 days ago
Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, we are pleased to announce that Lubuntu 16.04.2 LTS has been released! What is Lubuntu? Lubuntu is an official Ubuntu flavor based on the Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment (LXDE). The project’s ... [More] goal is to provide a lightweight yet functional distribution. Lubuntu specifically targets older machines with […] [Less]