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Analyzed 7 months ago. based on code collected 10 months ago.
Posted 7 months ago
We have created a Flick group for your submissions: https://www.flickr.com/groups/ubuntu-gnome-16-10 From all submissions, 10 wallpapers will be selected to be included in the 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release of Ubuntu GNOME. Rules of the Contest: It is ... [More] important to note Ubuntu – and hence Ubuntu GNOME – is shipped to users from every part of the globe. Your images should be considerate of this diversity and refrain from the following: No brand names or trademarks of any kind. No branding assets like “Ubuntu GNOME” or text in order to permit use by derivative distributions. No version numbers as some may prefer to continue to use your theme with an older version of Ubuntu. No illustrations some may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous. No sexually explicit or provocative images. No images of weapons or violence. No alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery. No designs which promotes bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals; or promotes discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age. No religious, political, or nationalist imagery. Constraints: Each user can submit up to 2 wallpapers. The final dimension should be at least 2560×1440 px (and 16:9 proportion if possible). Any smaller size will not be considered. Use PNG format for bitmap files, use JPG format for photos. Submissions must adhere to the Creative Commons ShareAlike 4.0 (see www.flickr.com/creativecommons/). If not specified, it’ll be assumed that the work is released under CC-BY-SA 4.0. Attribution must be declared if the submission is based on another design. [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
In last three months one of the task I had at archon.ai was to implement a pipeline to autodeploy our services. We use an instance of Gitlab to host our code, so after some proof of concepts we chose to use Gitlab CI to test and deploy our code. ... [More] Gitlab CI is amazing (as Gitlab is), Gitlab team is doing a great work and they implement new features every month. So today I chose to move also this blog to Gitlab CI. This blog is based on Jekyll. The source code was already hosted on Gitlab but, until yesterday, it didn’t use Gitlab CI: every time I pushed something, a webhook called a script on my server, the server downloaded the source code, compiled it and then published it. The bad in this that approach is the same server which runs the website (and other services as well) wasted CPU, storage and time doing compilation. I have others servers as well (but if you do not, don’t worry, Gitlab offers free runners for Gitlab CI if you host your project on Gitlab.com), so I installed a Gitlab runner as explained here and set it to use Docker. gitlab-ci.yml The first thing to do after enabling the runner was to create a gitlab-ci.yml file to explain to the runner how to do its job. The fact Gitlab uses a file to configure runners it’s a winning choice: developers can have it versioned in the source and each branch can have its own rules. My configuration file is this: image: ruby:2.3 stages: - deploy cache: paths: - vendor key: "$CI_BUILD_REPO" before_script: - gem install bundler deploy_site: stage: deploy only: - master script: - bundle install --path=vendor/ - bundle exec jekyll build artifacts: paths: - _site/ Quite simple, isn’t it? In the end I need only to deploy the website, I do not have tests, so I have only one stage, the deploy one. There are however few interesting things to highlight: I install gems in vendor/ instead of the default directory, so I can cache them and reuse in others builds, to save time and bandwidth The cache is shared between all the branches in the repo (key: “$CI_BUILD_REPO”). By default it is shared only between multiple builds of the same branch The deploy step is executed only when I push to master branch The site is build in _site/ directory, so I need to specify it in the artifacts section If you want to see how to tune these settings, or learn about others (there are a lot of them, it is a very versatile system which can do anything), take a look to the official guide. The Gemfile for bundler is very basic: source 'https://rubygems.org' gem "github-pages" gem "pygments.rb" It is important to add vendor directory to the exclude section in _config.yml, otherwise Jekyll will publish it as well. Deploy If you push these files on your Gitlab’s repo, and if you have done a good job setting up the runner, you will have an artifact in your repo to download. Next step is to deploy it to the server. There are tons of different possible solutions to do that. I created a sh script which is invoked by an hook. Since I already have PHP-fpm installed on the server due my Nextcloud installation, I use it to invoke the sh script through a php script. When you create a webhook in your Gitlab project (Settings->Webhooks) you can specify for which kind of events you want the hook (in our case, a new build), and a secret token so you can verify the script has been called by Gitlab. Unfortunately, the documentation about webhooks is very poor, and there isn’t any mention about builds payload. Anyway, after a couple of tries, I created this script: &1"); Since the repo of this blog is public, I cannot insert the token in the script itself (and I cannot insert it in the script on the server, because it is overwritten at every deploy). So I created a token.ini file outside the webroot, which is just one line: token = supersecrettoken In this way the endpoint can be called only by Gitlab itself. The script then checks some parameters of the build, and if everything is ok it runs the deploy script. Also the deploy script is very very basic, but there are a couple of interesting things: #!/bin/bash # See 'Authentication' section here: http://docs.gitlab.com/ce/api/ SECRET_TOKEN=$PERSONAL_TOKEN # The path where to put the static files DEST="/usr/share/nginx/html/" # The path to use as temporary working directory TMP="/tmp/" # Where to save the downloaded file DOWNLOAD_FILE="site.zip"; cd $TMP; wget --header="PRIVATE-TOKEN: $SECRET_TOKEN" "https://gitlab.com/api/v3/projects/774560/builds/artifacts/master/download?job=deploy_site" -O $DOWNLOAD_FILE; ls; unzip $DOWNLOAD_FILE; # Whatever, do not do this in a real environment without any other check rm -rf $DEST; cp -r _site/ $DEST; rm -rf _site/; rm $DOWNLOAD_FILE; First of all, the script has to be executable (chown +x deploy.sh) and it has to belong to the webserver’s user (usually www-data). The script needs to have an access token (which you can create here) to access the data. Again, I cannot put it in the script itself, so I inserted it as environment variable: sudo vi /etc/environment in the file you have to add something like: PERSONAL_TOKEN="supersecrettoken" and then remember to reload the file: source /etc/environment You can check everything is alright doing sudo -u www-data echo PERSONAL_TOKEN and verify the token is printed in the terminal. Now, the other interesting part of the script is where is the artifact. The last available build of a branch is reachable only through API; they are working on implementing the API in the web interface so you can always download the last version from the web. The url of the API is https://gitlab.example.com/api/v3/projects/projectid/builds/artifacts/branchname/download?job=jobname While you can imagine what branchname and jobname are, the projectid is a bit more tricky to find. It is included in the body of the webhook as projectid, but if you do not want to intercept the hook, you can go to the settings of your project, section Triggers, and there are examples of APIs calls: you can determine the project id from there. Kudos to the Gitlab team (and others guys who help in their free time) for their awesome work! If you have any question or feedback about this blog post, please drop me an email at riccardo@rpadovani.com :-) Bye for now, R. [Less]
Posted 7 months ago by david....@canonical.com (David Callé)
The latest version of snapd, the service powering snaps, has just landed in Ubuntu 16.04, here are some of the highlights of this release. New commands: buy, find private, disable, revert A lot of new commands are available, allowing you, for ... [More] example, to downgrade, disable and buy snaps: When logged into a store, snap find --private lets you see snaps that have been shared with you privately. The new buy command presents you a choice of payment backends for non-free snaps. snap disable allows you to disable specific snaps. A disabled snap won't be updated or launched anymore. It can be enabled with the snap enable command. snap revert allows you to revert a snap to its previous installed version. The refresh command now works with snaps installed in devmode. Snap try and broken states handling When using the snap try command to mount a folder containing a snap tree as an installed snap, you can end up with a broken snap if you happen to delete the folder without removing the snap first. This "broken" state is now acknowledged as a potential snap state and handled gracefully by the system. The broken tag now appears next to the snap in the snap list output and you can remove it with snap remove. Interfaces changes getsockopt has been allowed for connected x11 plugs. /usr/bin/locale access is now part of the default confinement policy. A new hardware-observe interface that gives snaps read access to hardware information from the system. See the implementation for details. Snapcraft 2.13 Snapcraft has also seen a new release (2.13) that brings: Enhanced Ubuntu Store integration with the introduction of snapcraft push (which deprecates upload) and snapcraft release. These are very important pieces to the Continuous Integration aspect of snapcraft, you will have more to read on this front very soon! A new plainbox plugin which allows parts containing a Plainbox test collection. Many improvements on sanitizing cloud parts declarations. Java plugins There has also been a strong focus on improving Java plugins with, for example: Improvements to the ant and maven plugins (support for targets). Introduction of a gradle plugin To learn how to use these plugins, the easiest way is to run snapcraft help ant, snapcraft help maven and snapcraft help gradle. Usage examples can be found in the Playpen repository and guidance in the snapcraft documentation. [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
Last week we released phase 1 of the new App Design Guides, which included Get started and Building blocks. Now we have just released phase 2: Patterns. This includes handy guidance on gestures, navigation and layout possibilities to provide a great ... [More] user experience in your app. Navigation: user journeys Find guidance for utilizing components for effective and natural user journeys within your UI. Layouts: using Grid Units Use the Grid Unit System to help visualise how much space you have in order to create a consistent and proportionate UI. More to come… More sections will be added to patterns in the future, such as search, accessibility and communication. Up next is phase 3: System integration; which includes the number of a touchpoints your app can plug into inside the Ubuntu operating system shell, such as the launcher, notifications and indicators. If you want to help us improve these guides, join our mailing list. We’d love to hear from you! [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
Last week we released phase 1 of the new App Design Guides, which included Get started and Building blocks. Now we have just released phase 2: Patterns. This includes handy guidance on gestures, navigation and layout possibilities to provide a great ... [More] user experience in your app. Navigation: user journeys Find guidance for utilizing components for effective and natural user journeys within your UI. Layouts: using Grid Units Use the Grid Unit System to help visualise how much space you have in order to create a consistent and proportionate UI. More to come… More sections will be added to patterns in the future, such as search, accessibility and communication. Up next is phase 3: System integration; which includes the number of a touchpoints your app can plug into inside the Ubuntu operating system shell, such as the launcher, notifications and indicators. If you want to help us improve these guides, join our mailing list. We’d love to hear from you! [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
It’s Episode Twenty-three of Season Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Laura Cowen and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain. We’re here again! In this week’s show: We discuss the news: Former OwnCloud Inc. ... [More] employee Carla Schroder has published the other side of the OwnCloud/Nextcloud fork story €1.2 million funding for Open Source projects in Germany UK tops the UN’s e-government survey but the service is having political problems Google has added YouTube to their HTTPS Transparency report Researchers at Princeton have shown that Web APIs allowing sites to access your battery status provide a new vector for uniquely identifying a device and you can see a demo here We discuss the community news: A consolidated YAML network configuration across Ubuntu announced Distrowatch comprehensively reviews the Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition Distro contributors and developers have written up their experiences of attending the recent Snappy Sprint in Heidelberg Fedora contributor – Neal Gompa KDE Developer – Harald Sitter Debian Maintainer – Luke Faraone Another week, another Skype update for Linux Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 includes Biometric Authentication for Meizu PRO 5 We mention some events: FOSS Talk Live – 6 August – London, UK Wuthering Bytes 2016 – 2-11 September – Hebden Bridge, W. Yorks, UK Barcamp Manchester – 24-25 September – CityLabs, Manchester, UK We discuss doing a bit of parkrun tourism and working to the sound of a dehumidifier. This weeks cover image is taken from Wikimedia. That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit. Join us on IRC in #ubuntu-podcast on Freenode [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
Heyo all! I’ve been quiet since SELF happened in June but since late July I’ve working quite a bit on github lately on UBports, Magic Device Tool and the Kubuntu Manual. I’ve also been making a few changes with the Kubuntu Podcast team to get our ... [More] show on Pocket Casts Android podcast app and have taken over editing the show. Dec was when I uploaded the Kubuntu Manual on github for the first time. The UBport is a project lead mostly by one guy to port Ubuntu Touch to as many devices as possible! I’ve been fixing grammar and typo issues since he is not a native English speaker. The Magic Device Tool has been getting merges from me for similar fixes as well, as well as some testing on the Nexus 4 and Nexus 7. It’s a series of scripts that can flash all the supported Ubuntu Touch devices from BQ, Meizu, Nexus 4 and 7 as well as some UBport devices with the newest release. The Kubuntu Manual has been a bit of a child of mine for over a year or so since I basically took over documentation for the Kubuntu project. It’s currently being worked on for the 16.10 release but we are also adding to the 16.04 one as well that is on docs.kubuntu.org.   Once a month fellow Kubuntu members Rick Timmis, Ovidiu-Florin Bogdan and I do a Podcast highlighting the work that has been done in the Kubuntu world aka #kubuntu-devel on IRC/Kubuntu Devel on Telegram. We also go over what we have been doing in and out of the project, our picks of Linux based apps in, a few interviews from people in KDE, Ubuntu and other Open Source related places, as well as my Game On section where we are proving you don’t have to be on Windows to get your “Game On”! We have the Show on BBB (BigBlueButton) which is on a server that was donated/sponsored to use by the company.    MP3     OGG [Less]
Posted 7 months ago by nos...@example.com (Dirk Deimeke)
Gestern durfte ich - auf Einladung von Florian - im Hackerspace des Chaos Computer Clubs Zürich die überarbeitete Version meines Vortrags Zeit- und Selbstmanagement halten, das PDF ist rund 11 MB gross (zeit-_und_selbstmanagement_ccczh.pdf). Mir hat ... [More] es sehr gut gefallen, die Leute waren nett und Hunde-kompatibel Ich habe einige Anregungen mitgenommen, die vielleicht in künftigen Vorträgen werden. [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
Welcome to the latest issue of Cloud Chatter. This month, don’t miss: An overview of our widely applauded universal “snap” packages launch A fantastic free trial offer for using Ubuntu on POWER8 with IBM’s Softlayer A story about a leading middle ... [More] eastern telco launching an NFV cloud using OpenStack and Juju Steps on how to leverage LXD and ZFS with Juju 2.0 A webinar co-hosted with Riftware on “NFV Orchestration Accelerated by Application Modelling” Our round-up of top blog posts and industry news New ‘Snap’ packages transform the installation and management of cloud and server applications Developers from multiple Linux distributions and companies have announced that they are collaborating on the “snap” universal Linux package format, enabling a single binary package to work perfectly and securely on any Linux-based system including cloud and server applications. Installing Jenkins or Cassandra, for example, becomes a single-command exercise on any distribution with snaps. The Snap format has been welcomed by Linux application vendors. It is a tremendous simplification to publish a snap rather than manage diverse package formats and security update mechanisms across many Linux distributions. Canonical is working with our vendor eco-system at snapcraft.io to provide a single publication mechanism for any software in any Linux environment. If you’d like to discuss how you can use snaps to package your cloud and server applications, don’t hesitate to contact us. Try Ubuntu on POWER8 for FREE for 30 days Canonical is collaborating with SoftLayer to offer a 30-day free trial to use the Ubuntu that you love on POWER8! Certified Ubuntu images provide first class security and quality assurance to guarantee the best possible experience on the industry’s leading clouds. This offer ends soon so don’t delay! Get Promo Code In other news Etisalat builds first NFV telco cloud in the Middle East on Ubuntu OpenStack Etisalat, the Middle East’s leading telecoms provider, has launched its first live Network Function Virtualization telco cloud in Abu Dhabi. The NFV-based telco infrastructure has been built with Quanta servers, Arista switches and Canonical’s Ubuntu OpenStack, a multi-vendor combination integrated for production for the first time ever globally. Learn more Webinar: NFV Orchestration Accelerated by Application Modeling Watch Canonical’s Bill Bauman and Matt Harper, RIFT.io’s Chief Development Officer, discuss how Juju has helped RIFT.ware, a standards-based orchestrator, leverage a model-driven framework to support multiple formats and scale to support massive numbers of VNFs and VMs. Watch on-demand webinar Juju 2.0 user interface redesign Juju has been given a brand-new look that makes it even easier to navigate and configure services than ever before. Juju 2.0’s more intuitive integration with the Charms Store makes it simple to select , connect, scale and deploy charms and bundles into a public cloud, OpenStack or on bare metal. Learn more about the Juju 2.0 UI design process How developers can leverage LXD & ZFS in Juju 2.0 One of the best things about using Juju locally on your laptop is the speed at which you can iterate locally and then push out to a real cloud. In the upcoming Juju 2.0 you can use LXD and the ZFS for an even faster performing development experience. Learn more about Juju, LXD and ZFS Meet the Juju community at the next Charmer Summit We’re proud to announce that we’re ready to have our third Juju Charmers Summit conference, taking place September 12-14 in Pasadena, California, USA. All our charming experts are gathering in one place to help spread charming knowledge and technical networking. Attendees will have access to experts in charming OpenStack, NFV, Big Data, Containers (Swarm, Kubernetes, and Mesos), and Benchmarking. Attendance is free for anyone who wants to participate. Join us in Pasadena! Top blog posts from Insights Vendors embrace Juju model-driven operations Special report: Low latency and real-time kernels for telco and NFV What’s the easiest way to start using big software? Meet Conjure-up A New Research Cloud on Ubuntu OpenStack Apache Bigtop and Juju: a charming approach to big data Canonical and Pivotal Collaborate to Deliver Cloud Native Platform Howto launch your own Snap store Ubuntu Cloud in the news Canonical and e-shelter announce managed OpenStack private cloud initiative IBM’s SoftLayer cloud gets certified Ubuntu Linux 16.04 LTS images 6WIND upgrades NFV platform on 40 Gbps Advantech servers Removing Operational Friction Will Free Big Data To Do Big Things, Says Mark Shuttleworth Canonical changes the game by announcing universal snap packages [Less]
Posted 7 months ago
Actually we released last week but since this is my first Planet Ubuntu blog seems like an opportune moment😉 Using the superb Budgie Desktop, we are pleased to follow the official Ubuntu and community flavour release cadence and offer up … Continue reading →