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RubyCAS-Server

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  Analyzed 10 months ago

RubyCAS-Server is a Ruby implementation of a server for Yale's Central Authentication Service. CAS provides single sign-on authentication for web applications. Since CAS is a solid, widely-adopted protocol, CAS clients are available for many platforms and frameworks, including Java, PHP, Ruby on ... [More] Rails, and others. RubyCAS-Server is designed to be simple to set up and configure (which is quite the opposite from it's popular Java cousin, the JA-SIG CAS Server). RubyCAS-Server is written using the Camping microframework. Code contributions are welcome. Please contact the author for access to the subversion repository. [Less]

2.88K lines of code

2 current contributors

over 1 year since last commit

7 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
I Use This

Bivouac

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  Analyzed 7 months ago

Bivouac is a simple generator for camping.

33.3K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 8 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
I Use This
Licenses: Apache-2.0, BSD-4-Cla..., GPL-2.0+

deb-buildservice

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  Analyzed over 2 years ago

A build service that creates .deb files from source using Checkinstall. It is run with Camping on a "server" machine, or a regular machine, and accepts uploaded source from another (usually slower, with no way to compile software due to speed or limited system resources) machine and gives back a ... [More] downloadable .deb file for the "slower" computer to install easily. [Less]

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

over 9 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: GPL-2.0+

fingr

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

What the duece is Fingr?Fingr is a Camping mini-app that Web 2.0-ifies Finger. In other words, it takes something that works just fine and makes it kinda lame :). The idea is that you can create a jabber account and link it to your Fingr install, send messages to said jabber account and VOILA! ... [More] They appear as though by magic in your browser. I liked this better when it was called Twitter!Yeah, I know. In fact, it uses xmpp4r-simple, which was written by the Twitter folks. Think of Fingr as an anti-social version of Twitter: it's for you and you alone, unless you choose to share the URL. How?Well, like I said before, it uses Camping and xmpp4r-simple. By association, it requires Ruby. It also needs rss/maker, but I think that's included with the price of Ruby. All in all, it's pretty simple. Copy config.yml.sample over to config.yml, enter the proper info and start it up: camping fingr.rbBy default, it'll start up on port 3301. If you want it to run somewhere else, just drop the --port option on it: camping --port 1234 fingr.rbWhere's the Screenshots, man?Sorry, but I aint gots no time for screenshots, fool. Check out http://fingr.mando.org if you're really curious about how it looks. Goodbye and good luck! [Less]

263 lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 9 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This

fluxr

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  No analysis available

fluxr Ruby Workflow Enginefluxr is a workflow engine with a slant towards web-based interaction (a web-based UI, web-services via a RESTful API). It is will be written in Ruby using the Camping framework, and uses OpenWFE to specify its workflows.

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

0 since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: GPL-2.0+

howlr

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

RESTful Messaging with HowlrThe Howlr daemon provides RESTful interface for sending outgoing messages. Messages are submitted via HTTP and dispatched to other protocols. Currently only email (SMTP and Sendmail) is supported, but other delivery methods (SMS, IM, etc.) are possible. The idea is to ... [More] provide a RESTful messaging service, as part of a larger REST-based enterprise infrastructure. FeaturesRESTful HTTP interface for back-end integration with other RESTful network resources Modular support for messaging protocols. Regular e-mail (via SMTP or sendmail) is available out of the box. Platform-independent, stand-alone server, installable as a Linux init.d service (it should be run on Windows as a background daemon too) Easy to configure via a single YAML file. Supports delivery callbacks that trigger further REST calls when a message is sent out to each of its recipients. InstallationInstall the gem and its dependencies: gem install howlr Run Howlr for the first time to generate a sample configuration file: howlr -c ~/howlr.yml Edit configuration in ~/howlr.yml Run again using the edited config file: howlr -c ~/howlr.yml Open up your browser and go to http://localhost:7008/messages/new to make sure it's working (your URL will be different if you changed the port and url prefix in your configuration). That's it. Your Howlr instance should now be ready to start receiving REST requests for sending out messages. UsageSimple example using Ruby's ActiveResource: require 'active_resource' # Define the proxy class class Message < ActiveResource::Base self.site = 'http://localhost:7008' end message = Message.new message.subject = "Howlr Test" message.body = "This is just a test!" message.from = "Test McTestski " message.recipients = "John Doe ; Sally Smith " # Saving the message commits it to the server, causing the message to # be sent out. message.save # The server temporarily stores copies of all sent messages. Saving a # message (i.e. sending it) assigns to it a unique ID. We can use this # ID to later retrieve a copy of this message. message2 = Message.find(message.id) Also a look at the HowlrAPI, and the PHP Zend_Rest_Client sample code. You will also probably want to configure Howlr to run as an init.d service. Finally, if you're interested in other RESTful services, have a look at Taskr, a RESTful scheduler daemon. [Less]

2.35K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 7 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This

pasteor

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  No analysis available

A pastebin written in ruby

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

0 since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: MIT

pdfetch

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

pdfetch is a small web app that automagically fetches the PDF reprint of a PubMed article given its PMID. If pdfetch cannot find a local copy of the reprint, then it downloads the reprint from the publisher's website to the local repository (of course only if the reprint is free or if you have ... [More] authorized access to it, e.g., via your university library). pdfetch can also be used for the creation of a shared local repository of PDF reprints designed for small trusted groups, e.g. science labs, by having every member of the group point to the same local server running pdfetch. If you use the "ferret" branch version of pdfetch, PDF reprints in the local repository can be easily searched using any web browser. pdfetch is best used from PubMed using a bookmarklet (for any modern web browser) or a greasemonkey script (for Firefox only). Both assume that the pdfetch server is listening on localhost:3301 and that Javascript is enabled in your web browser. To install the bookmarklet just drag the link in the list to your right onto your Links/Bookmarks toolbar/menu. To use the bookmarklet, just click it when using PubMed (of course the pdfetch server needs to be running too!). To install the greasemonkey script just make sure you are using Firefox + Greasemonkey and click on this link. It adds a 'Fetch' link to the article display page in PubMed for easy access to pdfetch. pdfetch requires Camping and Mechanize. To install pdfetch follow these easy steps: install Ruby + RubyGems install camping, mechanize, and mongrel by executing the following command gem install camping mechanize mongrel --include-dependencies save pdfetch.rb in the directory where you want the PDF reprints to reside. launch the pdfetch server by executing the following command camping pdfetch.rb or (for better security) camping -h 127.0.0.1 pdfetch.rb. You can change the port that the pdfetch server listens to (default is 3301) by executing the following command camping -p pdfetch.rb. If you have any problem, add -s mongrel to any of the above commands. you are ready to go!!! You can fetch the PDF reprint of a PubMed article with PMID '123456' by going to http://localhost:3301/fetch/123456 in your web browser, or by using the bookmarklet/greasemonkey script directly from PubMed. [Less]

291 lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 10 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This

redrooster

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  No analysis available

RedRooster is a simple web interface for etherwake. You can wake a computer on demand or schedule a wake up.

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

0 since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: MIT

ruby-matrix

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  No analysis available

ruby snippets, idioms and techniques from all over.

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

0 since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: LGPL