Tags : Browse Projects

Select a tag to browse associated projects and drill deeper into the tag cloud.

FEST

Compare

  Analyzed 12 months ago

FEST is a collection of compact and fluent APIs, which mission is to simplify software testing. The project provides libraries for: * Functional testing of Swing-based UIs * Functional testing of JavaFX-based UIs * Fluent interface for assertions * Easy-to-use fluent interface ... [More] for Java Reflection * Template for simplifying usage of mock objects [Less]

274K lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 4 years since last commit

23 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.58333
   
I Use This

JavaStubs

Compare

  Analyzed about 6 years ago

Provides method stubbing for concrete Java classes, intended for use with JUnit 4.

5.64K lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 8 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
I Use This

nutester

Compare

  Analyzed about 1 year ago

NU TesterAdvantagesThe idea behind the Tester libraries was to introduce a new testing framework that satisfied the abilities of JUnit, but enabled instructors less overhead when introducing test cases. The primary complaint was that it was not possible to introduce JUnit when working with Objects ... [More] , unless the students already had a proficient knowledge of Object equality, class hierarchies, and null. Because that knowledge is limited, at best, an alternative solution was born with the Tester library. When using NU Tester, students write test cases within methods that take a single argument, a Tester. It would resemble something like: boolean testStrings(Tester t){ String wes = "Wes"; return t.checkExpect(wes, "Wes"); }This example would be analogous to an "assertEquals" call inside of a JUnit test case. The primary differences that one would see between these two examples is that the Tester uses the console for reporting, and does not have any custom interface for IDE's. Please see the Wiki for continued examples. In DevelopmentThe Tester library is separated in two separate releases: Prima and Avanti. Prima is primarily meant to be used by those unfamiliar with how to write test cases, or if they are a novice in Java (or programming in general). Avanti has the advantage over Prima of including supplemental libraries that allow for code coverage analysis, and the writing of more complex test scenarios. The idea between the two levels was to reduce overhead to those who might be new to writing test cases. SourceThe source code is currently published freely through this google-code hosting site. Any user may checkout the code, but only project members are currently allowed to commit changes to the code-base. The framework is supported and developed by a small team of individuals at Northeastern University. Our temporary website can be found at: Javalib [Less]

333K lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 5 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
I Use This