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Spock Framework

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  Analyzed 2 days ago

Spock is a testing and specification framework for Java and Groovy developers. What makes it stand out from the crowd is its beautiful and highly expressive specification language. Thanks to its JUnit runner, Spock is compatible with most IDEs, build tools, and continuous integration servers. Spock ... [More] is inspired from JUnit, jMock, RSpec, Groovy, Scala, Vulcans, and other fascinating life forms. [Less]

56.2K lines of code

24 current contributors

3 months since last commit

27 users on Open Hub

Low Activity
4.75
   
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specs2

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  Analyzed 7 months ago

specs2 is a library for writing executable software specifications in Scala.

75.5K lines of code

15 current contributors

7 months since last commit

9 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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Codeception

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  Analyzed 2 days ago

Codeception is a new full-stack testing PHP framework. Inspired by BDD, it provides you absolutely new original way for writing acceptance, functional and even unit tests.

336K lines of code

175 current contributors

3 months since last commit

3 users on Open Hub

High Activity
5.0
 
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Specter BDD Framework

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  Analyzed 12 months ago

Specter is an object-behaviour specification framework for .NET. It enables behaviour-driven development by requiring developers to write executable specifications for their objects, before actually implementing them. Technologically this is similar to test driven development, however the shift ... [More] in nomenclature removes the psychological barrier of writing "tests" for code that does not exist. (Existing projects implementing this idea include RSpec for Ruby and NSpec for .NET) Specter uses Boo meta-programming features and therefore allows very readable specifications to be written. [Less]

3.14K lines of code

0 current contributors

about 9 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.0
   
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Trapeze

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  Analyzed about 2 months ago

Trapeze generates a suite of unit tests or specifications for existing Ruby source code. This is accomplished through dynamic analysis, by reflecting on the public interfaces of classes, modules and top-level methods defined in the source. Trapeze then exercises each object, module and method ... [More] , recording the behavior of the code. This recorded behavior is captured in a suite of test cases or specifications that can be rendered as test code or executable specifications. In essence, Trapeze is a tool for characterizing Ruby source code. Trapeze lets you fly high as you maintain and enhance a Ruby codebase that lacks test or spec coverage, knowing that you have a regression safety net underneath you. [Less]

10.7K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 8 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
3.0
   
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concordion-extensions

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  Analyzed about 17 hours ago

This project is now deprecated. The extensions have been split into individual modules - see http://concordion.org/Extensions.html. Adds features to Concordion, such as embedding screenshots or logging information in the output. Includes an example project that demonstrates the extensions ... [More] using Concordion with Selenium 2 (WebDriver) for end-to-end browser testing. [Less]

3.03K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 2 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Inactive
0.0
 
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instinct

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

AboutInstinct is a Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) framework for Java. Inspired by RSpec, Instinct provides flexible annotation of contexts, specifications and actors; automatic creation of test doubles and test subjects; a state and behaviour expectation API; JUnit test runner integration; Ant ... [More] support and an IntelliJ IDEA plugin. DownloadInstinct 0.2.0: Maintenance release; Ant HTML reports; improved public APIs, bug fixes. Downloads: Release | Example Project | Release Notes DocumentationInstinct in 2 Minutes - Quick introduction to get Instinct up and running. User's Guide - Instinct user's guide. FAQ - Frequently asked questions. Roadmap - Development roadmap. SponsorsInstinct development is sponsored by Workingmouse. Development tools are provided by the following organisations. [Less]

26.4K lines of code

0 current contributors

about 7 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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xcordion

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

XCordion is the working title of an unofficial development branch of the open-source Concordion software specification and testing framework. This is a work in progress, and not supported or sanctioned by the original authors of Concordion. Concordion is a testing tool similar in approach to the ... [More] FIT framework, but (we believe) easier to understand and use. Non-technical team members write HTML documents containing plain-English acceptance test criteria. This HTML is then instrumented with code and assertions at appropriate points in the document. When the tests are run (usually by a JUnit test class), an output document is generated from the original document highlighting (through lots of pretty red/green colors) which assertions have passed and which have failed. This Google Code project serves primarily as our public sandbox, as we develop changes which will be submitted back to the main Concordion maintainers at some point. Our current goals include better table handling and the ability to run tests written for earlier, commercial releases of Concordion. Future goals include support for other scripting engines, such as JRuby or Rhino. [Less]

16.2K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 5 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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bdoc

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  Analyzed about 1 year ago

Last update, 25.10.2009. Read more on the News. AboutBDoc documents behaviour specified by unit tests. In its easiest form it is like TestDox, creating simple documentation from the method names in JUnit test cases. In its more advanced form it can produce a quality report, describing ... [More] userstories and behaviour implemented by the code. This will give extra value to the developers and testers of the team. It will contribute on giving attention to unittesting, test-driven development and behaviour-driven development. By showing the report to the business people and testers the developers will get feedback on how they describe the domain, which contributes to code (and developers) being in sync with the UbiquitousLanguage of the project. A quality report giving value can be achieved by adding some thought to how a test is named, writing it as sentence describing behaviour. DanNorh.net gives an excellent article on this topic. If user stories is used on the project it is also possible to reference the user story from the test, adding even more value to the end report. BDoc will structure a report by userstories, specifications and examples. The best documentation are as always examples, so look below. Read more about BDoc on TheServerSide.com ExampleThe code below describes and tests the behaviour of an ExecutiveOfficer. The testcase uses a Reference to a Story, one scenario, one statement and a few specifications. Running BDoc on this code, together with testcases for Task and TaskList, will produce the report shown below. BDoc now requires a tiny bdd-framework in order to extract example data. The framework (or the class if you like) must be implemented by your project, in the relevant language. BDoc needs this construction in order to inject proxies into the test, while it is running, analyzing method calls and data for the report. package com.googlecode.bdoc.examples.taskhandling; import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals; import static org.junit.Assert.assertFalse; import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.List; import org.junit.Test; @Ref(Story.TASKTRACKING) public class TestExecutiveOfficerBehaviour extends ExampleSupport { private ExecutiveOfficer currentOfficer; private Task currentTask; @Test public void aNewExecutiveOfficerShouldNotHaveAnyTasksInHisOrHerTaskList() { ExecutiveOfficer officer = new ExecutiveOfficer("Bob"); assertTrue(officer.getTaskList().getList().isEmpty()); } @Test public void defaultAssignmentOfTasksIsToTheCreatorOfATask() { given.officer(new ExecutiveOfficer("Bob")); when.theOfficerCreatesATaskWithDescription("*Register salesorder*"); then.ensureTheTaskIsAssignedToTheOfficer(currentOfficer); } void officer(ExecutiveOfficer officer) { this.currentOfficer = officer; } void theOfficerCreatesATaskWithDescription(String description) { currentTask = currentOfficer.createTask(description); } void ensureTheTaskIsAssignedToTheOfficer(ExecutiveOfficer officer) { assertTrue(officer.isAssignedTo(currentTask)); } @Test public void aTaskShouldBeMarkedWithInprogressWhenItIsStartedByAnExecutiveOfficer() { ExecutiveOfficer officer = new ExecutiveOfficer("Bob"); Task task = officer.createTask("Register salesorder"); officer.start(task); assertTrue(task.getInProgress()); } @Test public void aClosedTaskShouldBeRemovedFromTheTasklist() { given.officer(new ExecutiveOfficer("Bob")); and.theOfficerCreatesATaskWithDescription("*Register salesorder*"); and.theOfficerStartsTheTask(currentTask); when.theOfficerClosesTheTask(currentTask); then.ensureTheTaskIsRemovedFromTheExecutiveOfficer(currentOfficer); } void theOfficerStartsTheTask(Task task) { currentOfficer.start(task); } void theOfficerClosesTheTask(Task task) { currentOfficer.close(task); } void ensureTheTaskIsRemovedFromTheExecutiveOfficer(ExecutiveOfficer officer) { assertFalse(officer.getTaskList().getList().contains(currentTask)); } @Test public void shouldHaveAnEstimatedEtcEqualToTheSumOfTasksAssigned() { given.officer(new ExecutiveOfficer("Bob")); and.theOfficerIsAssigned(tasksForHandlingAStandardSalesOrder()); then.ensureEstimatedEtcInMinutesEquals(12); } void theOfficerIsAssigned(List tasks) { currentOfficer.assign( tasks ); } List tasksForHandlingAStandardSalesOrder() { List list = new ArrayList(); list.add(new Task("Register salesorder",4)); list.add(new Task("Check stock",2)); list.add(new Task("Print and finish order",6)); return list; } void ensureEstimatedEtcInMinutesEquals(int expectedEtc) { assertEquals(expectedEtc, currentOfficer.getTaskList().getEtc()); } }Report generated by BDoc: [Less]

17.4K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 7 years since last commit

0 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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