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Analyzed 2 days ago. based on code collected 2 days ago.
Posted 2 days ago
The second edition of the Xtext book should be published soon! In the meantime it is already available for preorders. At the time of writing, you can benefit for discounts and preorder it at 10$. I’ll detail the differences and novelties of this ... [More] second edition. But, first things first! A huge thank you to Jan Köhnlein, for reviewing this second edition, and a special thank you to Sven Efftinge, for writing the foreword to this second edition. I am also grateful to itemis Schweiz, and in particular, to Serano Colameo for sponsoring the writing of this book. While working on this second edition, I updated all the contents of the previous edition in order to make them up to date with respect to what Xtext provides in the most recent release (at the time of writing, it is 2.10). All the examples have been rewritten from scratch. The main examples, Entities, Expressions and SmallJava, are still there, but many parts of the DSLs, including their features and implementations, have been modified and improved, focusing on efficient implementation techniques and the best practices I learned in these years. Thus, while the features of most of the main example DSLs of the book is the same as in the first edition, their implementation is completely new. Moreover, In the last chapters, many more examples are also introduced. Chapter 11 on Continuous Integration, which in the previous edition was called “Building and Releasing”, has been completely rewritten and it is now based on Maven/Tycho and on Gradle, since Xtext now provides a project wizard that also creates a build configuration for these build tools. Building with Maven/Tycho is described in more details in the chapter, and Gradle is briefly described. This new chapter also briefly describes the new Xtext features: DSL editor on the web and also on IntelliJ. I also added a brand new chapter at the end of the book, Chapter 13 “Advanced Topics”, with much more advanced material and techniques that are useful when your DSL grows in size and features. For example, the chapter will show how to manually maintain the Ecore model for your DSL in several ways, including Xcore. This chapter also presents an advanced example that extends Xbase, including the customization of its type system and compiler. An introduction to Xbase is still presented in Chapter 12, as in the previous edition, but with more details. As in the previous edition, the book fosters unit testing a lot. An entire chapter, Chapter 7 “Testing”, is still devoted to testing all aspects of an Xtext DSL implementation. Most chapters, as in the previous edition, still have a tutorial nature. Summarizing, while the title and the subject of most chapters is still the same, their contents have been completely reviewed, extended and, hopefully, improved. If you enjoyed the first edition of the book and found it useful, I hope you’ll like this second edition even more. Be Sociable, Share! Tweet [Less]
Posted 2 days ago by nore...@blogger.com (Christian Pontesegger)
During our first tutorial we started an installation using the Oomph installer. Now we will have a closer look on the applied tasks, how to monitor and relaunch them and where these settings get persisted.Oomph TutorialsFor a list of all Oomph ... [More] related tutorials see my Oomph Tutorials Overview.Workspace SetupRight after the installation Oomph prepares your workspace. While busy you can see a spinning icon in the status bar at the bottom of your eclipse installation. A double click reveals a progress dialog where you can investigate all actions Oomph performs.Oomph provides a toolbar, which is hidden by default. Enable it in Preferences / Oomph / Setup Tasks by checking Show tool bar contributions. Now we can repeat setup tasks or add additional project setups to our installation using the Import Projects... wizard from the toolbar setup entry.Preferences RecorderOne of the most interesting features of Oomph is the preferences recorder. It can be enabled in the preferences window by selecting the record item in the bottom left corner. Once enabled it records all preference changes and stores them for you. When switching to another workspace these settings are applied directly. In practice this means: change a setting once and as long as you stick to Oomph you never have to think about it anymore.Generally setup tasks (like setting preferences) may be stored to one of three different locations: UserThis is a global storage on your local machine shared for all installations and workspaces. Most of your changes will go here. InstallationSettings get stored in the configuration folder of your current eclipse installation. These settings apply as long as you stick to the current eclipse binary. WorkspaceThese settings get stored in the .metadata folder of your current workspace. So they are workspace specific, no matter which eclipse binary you use to access this workspace. Personally I did not find a use case for options 2 or 3 yet.Investigate Oomph SetupsNow that we know of the different storage locations, we can have a look at their content. The second toolbar item allows to open each one of them in the Setup Editor (setups are also available from the Navigate /  Open Setup menu).The editor displays a tree structure of all Oomph tasks. As it is based on EMF we have to open the Properties view to display details of each tree element. If an element has a [restricted] annotation next to its name this means that the definition of this item is referenced by the current setup file. Typically this refers to a setup stored on the web. Such entries are readable, but cannot be changed without opening the original setup file.Now that you are familiar with the basic ingredients we are ready to start building our own project setups. [Less]
Posted 3 days ago
Join us September 12 in London for the Eclipse IoT Day at ThingMonk!
Posted 4 days ago
One of my favourite IoT events is the Thingmonk conference produced by Redmonk. The speakers and attendees are always amazing and provide great insight into the IoT community in the UK and Europe.   This year the speaker line-up for Thingmonk is ... [More] looking awesome so I expect to learn lots again this year. A new addition for Thingmonk this year is that we are organizing an Eclipse IoT Day @ Thingmonk on Day 0. We are planning an equally awesome line-up of speakers that will showcase how open source and Eclipse IoT has changing the IoT industry. The Eclipse IoT Day speaker will include: Kamil Baczkowicz from DeltaRail will be talking about their experiences of using MQTT and Eclipse IoT for building signal-control systems for railways. This will be real IoT in action! Patrizia Gufler from IBM Watson will showcase her work for integrating Eclipse Kura with IBM Watson. Kai Hudalla from Bosch will continue an IoT cloud theme in his talk about an Open IoT stack for IoT@cloud-scale. Our very own Benjamin Cabe will also be talking about the Eclipse IoT open strategy. We plan to announce a few more speakers over the next couple of weeks. It should be pretty awesome. After the Eclipse IoT Day, will be the Thingmonk HackDay. I fully expect to see further hacks on integrating Eclipse Kura with IBM Watson, Eclipse IoT running on Cloud Foundry and IBM Watson, and I am sure Benjamin will bring along some new boards. This is going to be a great way to kick-off Thingmonk. Eclipse IoT Day @ Thingmonk is September 12 and Thingmonk is September 13-14. The costs for Eclipse IoT Day is £50.00 . You will want to stay for the full 3 days and that costs only £200.00.  This is a great event that you won’t want to miss. [Less]
Posted 4 days ago
One of my favourite IoT events is the Thingmonk conference produced by Redmonk. The speakers and attendees are always amazing and provide great insight into the IoT community in the UK and Europe.   This year the speaker line-up for Thingmonk is ... [More] looking awesome so I expect to learn lots again this year. A new addition for Thingmonk this year is that we are organizing an Eclipse IoT Day @ Thingmonk on Day 0. We are planning an equally awesome line-up of speakers that will showcase how open source and Eclipse IoT has changing the IoT industry. The Eclipse IoT Day speaker will include: Kamil Baczkowicz from DeltaRail will be talking about their experiences of using MQTT and Eclipse IoT for building signal-control systems for railways. This will be real IoT in action! Patrizia Gufler from IBM Watson will showcase her work for integrating Eclipse Kura with IBM Watson. Kai Hudalla from Bosch will continue an IoT cloud theme in his talk about an Open IoT stack for IoT@cloud-scale. Our very own Benjamin Cabe will also be talking about the Eclipse IoT open strategy. We plan to announce a few more speakers over the next couple of weeks. It should be pretty awesome. After the Eclipse IoT Day, will be the Thingmonk HackDay. I fully expect to see further hacks on integrating Eclipse Kura with IBM Watson, Eclipse IoT running on Cloud Foundry and IBM Watson, and I am sure Benjamin will bring along some new boards. This is going to be a great way to kick-off Thingmonk. Eclipse IoT Day @ Thingmonk is September 12 and Thingmonk is September 13-14. The costs for Eclipse IoT Day is £50.00 . You will want to stay for the full 3 days and that costs only £200.00.  This is a great event that you won’t want to miss. [Less]
Posted 7 days ago
Here’s a picture from our Hackathon last evening: https://wiki.eclipse.org/Hackathon_Hamburg_2016_Jan Please subscribe to the mailing list if you’d like to get informed about next Hackathon events: https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/hackathon
Posted 7 days ago
Here’s a picture from our Hackathon last evening: https://wiki.eclipse.org/Hackathon_Hamburg_2016_Jan Please subscribe to the mailing list if you’d like to get informed about next Hackathon events: https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/hackathon
Posted 8 days ago by nore...@blogger.com (Jens v.P.)
Some years ago I wrote a small tool for creating OmniGraffle UML diagrams directly from Java source code. Visualizing Java is nice, but since I'm often use ecore/Xcore to define my models, I wanted a tool to also nicely visualize EMF based models. ... [More] I have now extended my tool, j2og, to also create UML class diagrams from ecore or Xcore models. Below you see a (manually layouted) version of an automatically generated diagram of the ecore library example. j2og does not layout the diagram, since OmniGraffle provides some nice layout algorithms anyway. When creating the diagram, you can tweak the output with several settings. For example show or hide attribute and operation compartments show context, optionally grayed out -- the context are classifiers defined in an external package show package names, omit common package prefixes etc. and more Note that besides OmniGraffle, you can open the diagrams with other tools (Diagrammix, Lucidchart) as well. See the j2og github page for details. You can install the tool via update site or Eclipse marketplace link. The following image (click to enlarge) is the result of exporting a large Xcore model defining the AST of N4JS, a statically typed version of JavaScript. I have exported it and applied the hierarchy layout algorithm -- no other manual tweaks were applied. Of course, this diagram is probably too large to be really useable, but it is a great start to document (parts) of the model. Well, in case of an AST you probably prefer using an EBNF grammar ;-) PS: Of course you could use ecoretools to create an UML diagram. I usually need the diagrams for documentation purposes. In that case, OmniGraffle simply is so much better since it is easier to use and the diagrams look so much nicer, (sorry, ecoretools). [Less]
Posted 8 days ago by nore...@blogger.com (Jens v.P.)
Some years ago I wrote a small tool for creating OmniGraffle UML diagrams directly from Java source code. Visualizing Java is nice, but since I'm often use ecore/Xcore to define my models, I wanted a tool to also nicely visualize EMF based models. ... [More] I have now extended my tool, j2og, to also create UML class diagrams from ecore or Xcore models. Below you see a (manually layouted) version of an automatically generated diagram of the ecore library example. j2og does not layout the diagram, since OmniGraffle provides some nice layout algorithms anyway. When creating the diagram, you can tweak the output with several settings. For example show or hide attribute and operation compartments show context, optionally grayed out -- the context are classifiers defined in an external package show package names, omit common package prefixes etc. and more Note that besides OmniGraffle, you can open the diagrams with other tools (Diagrammix, Lucidchart) as well. See the j2og github page for details. You can install the tool via update site or Eclipse marketplace link. The following image (click to enlarge) is the result of exporting a large Xcore model defining the AST of N4JS, a statically typed version of JavaScript. I have exported it and applied the hierarchy layout algorithm -- no other manual tweaks were applied. Of course, this diagram is probably too large to be really useable, but it is a great start to document (parts) of the model. Well, in case of an AST you probably prefer using an EBNF grammar ;-) PS: Of course you could use ecoretools to create an UML diagram. I usually need the diagrams for documentation purposes. In that case, OmniGraffle simply is so much better since it is easier to use and the diagrams look so much nicer, (sorry, ecoretools). [Less]
Posted 8 days ago
Read great articles about Cloud Foundry and Docker Tooling, Buildship, and Automated Error Reporting.