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Analyzed about 2 months ago. based on code collected 7 months ago.
Community Rating
5.0
 

Average Rating:   5.0/5.0
Number of Ratings:   4
Number of Reviews:   1

My Review of Evennia

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Most Helpful Reviews

Griatch says:
8954b1298c209c874e3c862cbc48e23f?&s=58&rating=pg&d=http%3a%2f%2fopenhub.net%2fanon80
A well featured codebase being f...  
5.0
 
written almost 8 years ago

Looking at MUD barebones codebases is quite a jarring experience. There are plenty of them around, certainly for C programmers, but for Python users the amount is a lot smaller.

The pure-Python implementations are (the ones I've tried at least) mostly obscure and buggy, some to the point that one could just as well start from scratch. There are some very promising C engines that use Python as its scripting language, but if you are mainly interested in working in Python, you are nevertheless inherently limited to what its script engine makes visible to you - it's unavoidable that one needs to dabble in C at some point.

What I look for in a codebase is first and foremost extendability in order to accomplish the visions I have for my game. I'm talking extendability down to the root here - If I wanted to, I should be able to change the entire way objects work, creating whole new character usage concepts and playstyles.

When I eventually came upon Evennia I was intrigued by its use of twisted and django for its base. It made sense - they are well-documented and supported projects, not to mention the possibility to extend into the web browser. Starting to look into the code I also found that it was easy to follow, well structured and documented - it feels very 'modern' for lack of a better word.

Evennia is by far the most transparent MUD/MUX/MUSH codebase I've come across (and dropping a mail to the mailing list resolves any remaining confusion).
The interesting thing is that the prospective admin expands on the system in the form of normal Python modules. This makes the system a dream to expand on to any level of complexity and uniqueness you want - it depends very little on what the evennia developers "thought of" you needing.

The goal of the codebase is otherwise to mimic the MUX system style when it comes to commands. This is fine as a baseline, but if one wants a completely different scheme, this would be very easy to implement.

That said, the system is still very barebones -- it's already very stable for me, but there is still work going on to make the core engine even more extendable and usable. Many basic MUX commands and features are also still missing. But since it's all Python, the eager admin can easily add the subset needed.

... So to summarize, I would dearly recommend Evennia to the Python-savvy admin who wants great power to shape the game of their dreams. If you are looking for a click-and-play MUD install, this is not for you - but then again, why would you then be looking at a bare-bones codebase in the first place? ;)
.
Griatch

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Most Recent Reviews

Griatch says:
8954b1298c209c874e3c862cbc48e23f?&s=58&rating=pg&d=http%3a%2f%2fopenhub.net%2fanon80
A well featured codebase being f...  
5.0
 
written almost 8 years ago

Looking at MUD barebones codebases is quite a jarring experience. There are plenty of them around, certainly for C programmers, but for Python users the amount is a lot smaller.

The pure-Python implementations are (the ones I've tried at least) mostly obscure and buggy, some to the point that one could just as well start from scratch. There are some very promising C engines that use Python as its scripting language, but if you are mainly interested in working in Python, you are nevertheless inherently limited to what its script engine makes visible to you - it's unavoidable that one needs to dabble in C at some point.

What I look for in a codebase is first and foremost extendability in order to accomplish the visions I have for my game. I'm talking extendability down to the root here - If I wanted to, I should be able to change the entire way objects work, creating whole new character usage concepts and playstyles.

When I eventually came upon Evennia I was intrigued by its use of twisted and django for its base. It made sense - they are well-documented and supported projects, not to mention the possibility to extend into the web browser. Starting to look into the code I also found that it was easy to follow, well structured and documented - it feels very 'modern' for lack of a better word.

Evennia is by far the most transparent MUD/MUX/MUSH codebase I've come across (and dropping a mail to the mailing list resolves any remaining confusion).
The interesting thing is that the prospective admin expands on the system in the form of normal Python modules. This makes the system a dream to expand on to any level of complexity and uniqueness you want - it depends very little on what the evennia developers "thought of" you needing.

The goal of the codebase is otherwise to mimic the MUX system style when it comes to commands. This is fine as a baseline, but if one wants a completely different scheme, this would be very easy to implement.

That said, the system is still very barebones -- it's already very stable for me, but there is still work going on to make the core engine even more extendable and usable. Many basic MUX commands and features are also still missing. But since it's all Python, the eager admin can easily add the subset needed.

... So to summarize, I would dearly recommend Evennia to the Python-savvy admin who wants great power to shape the game of their dreams. If you are looking for a click-and-play MUD install, this is not for you - but then again, why would you then be looking at a bare-bones codebase in the first place? ;)
.
Griatch

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