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Colloquy

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  Analyzed about 2 months ago

Traditionally, chat clients on the Mac have been anything but glamorous. Colloquy is an advanced IRC, SILC & ICB client which aims to fill this void. By adhering to Mac OS X interface conventions, Colloquy has the look and feel of a quality Mac application.

338K lines of code

6 current contributors

about 2 months since last commit

153 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
3.875
   
I Use This
Licenses: BSD-3-Clause, GPL-2.0+

cocos2d for iPhone

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  Analyzed over 2 years ago

cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, demos, and other graphical/interactive applications. It is based on the cocos2d design: it uses the same API, but instead of using python it uses objective-c. Main features: * Platforms: iOS and Mac * Scene management * ... [More] Transitions between scenes * Sprites * Actions * Basic menus and buttons * Integrated physics engine * Particle system * Text rendering support * Texture Atlas support * Tile Map support * Touch/Accelerometer support * Portrait and Landscape mode * Integrated Pause/Resume * Supports PVR and PVRTC images * Language: objective-c * Open Source: Compatible with open and closed source projects * OpenGL 1.5 and OpenGL ES 1.1 based [Less]

80.1K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 3 years since last commit

43 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.92308
   
I Use This

macvim

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  Analyzed 22 days ago

MacVim is a port of the text editor Vim to Mac OS X. MacVim supports multiple windows with tabbed editing and a host of other features such as: bindings to standard OS X keyboard shortcuts (⌘Z, ⌘V, ⌘A, ⌘G, etc.), transparent backgrounds, full-screen mode, multibyte editing with OS X input ... [More] methods and automatic font substitution, ODB editor support, and more. Most importantly, MacVim brings you the full power of Vim 7.2 to Mac OS X. Note: MacVim is in no way connected with http://macvim.org. That site is no longer being maintained and only provides outdated binaries of the old Carbon port of Vim. Snow LeopardMacVim now builds as 64 bit by default on Snow Leopard (10.6). I simplified the build process as well, so check out the Building wiki page on how to build your own binary. The stable build seems to run fine on Snow Leopard, but please consider using a snapshot instead as they are built specifically for Snow Leopard (the snapshot also runs on Leopard). DownloadThere are two official binaries of MacVim to choose from: Stable: The latest stable release is MacVim 7.2 stable 1.2 which was released on the 21st of August 2008. It is a universal binary which runs on Mac OS X 10.4 and 10.5. Mac OS X 10.6 ("Snow Leopard") seems to work fine as well but I strongly suggest using the latest snapshot build on Snow Leopard. Snapshot: A new snapshot is released every month or so and contains several features and bug-fixes which have not yet been included in the stable build. The latest version can be downloaded here. If the download fails for some reason then try using the download mirror. You may also build your own version from the source code. Please consider contributing to the MacVim project if you are able. MacVim is distributed free as charityware (type :h license inside MacVim for details). If you find MacVim a useful addition to your life please consider helping needy children in Uganda. Getting startedThe book A Byte of Vim is freely available online and is suitable for newcomers as well as more experienced users of Vim. Another freely available online book is Vim Recipies which serves as a cookbook where you can look up different ways to perform a specific task. There are also several Vim tutorials available online, such as this Vim introduction and tutorial. Once familiar with the basics you may benefit from using the following article on Efficient Editing With Vim as a quick reference. Before diving into all that material, you may want to read the article "Why use Vim?" which dispels common misconceptions about Vim and also provides examples which illustrate some of its many features. Vim comes bundled with a tutor which can be quite helpful to go through since it encourages you to experiment as you read. At the moment it requires some trickery to get going, but once there it should be easy to follow. The tutor is a text file which needs to be copied to a folder where it can be modified. To copy the tutor to your home folder, open MacVim and type (make sure you are in normal mode first by hitting Esc): :!cp $VIMRUNTIME/tutor/tutor ~/then hit enter. This will place a file named tutor in your home folder. Now, to start the tutor simply open that file in MacVim, e.g. by pressing ⌘O to show the file open dialog and then browsing to the tutor file. How to get helpThere is a fairly active mailing list called vim_mac where you can post questions about MacVim and request new features. Before posting a question, you should consult the FAQ, search the vim_mac archives, and consult the built-in Vim help by typing :h macvim inside MacVim. Since the binary releases always are a couple of versions behind the source code it is also possible that any problems you encounter may already have been fixed. Check the change log for the latest updates to the source code. Help me!If you find a bug, then please file an Issue report but first make sure that it has not already been reported by searching for old Issues. Unless you are absolutely sure that you have really found a bug you should probably post a question on the vim_mac mailing list first. (Note that there are several people answering questions on the mailing list whereas there is only one of me responding to Issue reports.) [Less]

530K lines of code

0 current contributors

about 3 years since last commit

39 users on Open Hub

Inactive
4.72727
   
I Use This

The Unarchiver

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  Analyzed over 1 year ago

The Unarchiver is a much more capable replacement for "BOMArchiveHelper.app", the built-in archive unpacker program in Mac OS X. The Unarchiver is designed to handle many more formats than BOMArchiveHelper, and to better fit in with the design of the Finder. It can also handle filenames in foreign ... [More] character sets, created with non-English versions of other operating systems. I personally find it useful for opening Japanese archives, but it should handle many other languages just as well. [Less]

465K lines of code

1 current contributors

over 2 years since last commit

15 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.33333
   
I Use This

X-Chat Aqua

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  Analyzed 9 months ago

X-Chat Aqua is X-Chat with an Aqua interface for MacOS X. X-Chat Aqua uses the irc engine from X-Chat, and is designed to look and feel like the GTK+ front end.

26.2K lines of code

1 current contributors

over 1 year since last commit

11 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.0
   
I Use This

Backbone

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  Analyzed 22 days ago

Backbone is a user environment, using the GNUstep libraries, using the design of the NeXTstep/OPENSTEP user environment as a springboard; the idea is to do better, not just different.

14.2K lines of code

1 current contributors

6 months since last commit

11 users on Open Hub

Very Low Activity
3.0
   
I Use This

three20

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  Analyzed 14 days ago

Three20 is an open source iPhone development library. It provides a large number of powerful features for developing web-driven applications. Three20 is also the backbone of the Facebook for iPhone app, one of the most downloaded iPhone apps of all time.

0 lines of code

0 current contributors

over 3 years since last commit

9 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
4.5
   
I Use This
Mostly written in language not available
Licenses: Apache-2.0

Cappuccino

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  Analyzed 13 days ago

Cappuccino is an open source framework that makes it easy to build desktop-caliber applications that run in a web browser. Cappuccino is written in Objective-J, a version of Objective-C implemented in JavaScript.

595K lines of code

7 current contributors

about 1 month since last commit

8 users on Open Hub

Moderate Activity
4.7
   
I Use This

SMC

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  Analyzed over 1 year ago

SMC - the State Machine Compiler SMC takes a state machine stored in a .sm file and generates a State pattern in fourteen programming languages (C, C++, C#, [incr Tcl], Groovy, Java, Lua, Objective-C, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby, Scala, VB.net). Includes: default transitions, transition args ... [More] , transition guards, push/pop transitions and Entry/Exit actions. See all details on http://smc.sourceforge.net/. [Less]

80.9K lines of code

2 current contributors

over 2 years since last commit

7 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
I Use This

Midgard2

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  Analyzed 7 days ago

Midgard2 is an Open Source Content Repository. It provides an object-oriented and replicated environment for building data-intensive applications for both web and the desktop. With Midgard2 you have generic way to define your own storage objects, that can then be queried and managed using ... [More] multiple programming languages and applications. This enables writing your CMS or project management tool using a repository-oriented architecture where the Midgard2 storage system acts as the central point of integration between various tools. Midgard2 is built on the GNOME stack of libraries like GLib and libgda, and has language bindings for C, Python and PHP. Communications between applications written in the different languages happen over D-Bus. [Less]

78.6K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 2 years since last commit

6 users on Open Hub

Inactive
5.0
 
I Use This