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ArmedBear Common Lisp (ABCL)

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  Analyzed 20 days ago

ABCL is an implementation of Common Lisp (CL) running in the JVM: it can run in the same JVM as your Java code, allowing full mixture of Lisp and Java code. Being a full CL implementation, it runs many existing libraries and applications, such as Maxima, a computer algebra system. With support for ... [More] JSR-223, you easily extend any JSR-223 compatible application with Lisp as a macro language. This includes integration with the Ant build system using its script-tag. ABCL features both an interpreter and a compiler which compiles into jvm byte code. [Less]

129K lines of code

1 current contributors

about 1 month since last commit

24 users on Open Hub

Very Low Activity
3.75
   
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Catrobat

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  Analyzed about 2 months ago

Catrobat is a mobile visual programming system. Catroid is an IDE and Catrobat interpreter for Android. Paintroid is an associated paint program for Android that, among others, allows setting parts of images to transparent. IDEs and interpreters for iOS and HTML5 browsers are in beta stage. There ... [More] are many subprojects, e.g., allowing to enter musical notation by singing into the mike, or to program a Parrot AR.Drone. We use Test-Driven Development along with other agile methods such as Kanban, ensuring a clear and 100% up-to-date documentation. [Less]

669K lines of code

103 current contributors

about 2 months since last commit

8 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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Licenses: CC-BY-SA-4.0, AGPL 3.0+

Chapel

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  Analyzed 21 days ago

Chapel is an emerging programming language designed for productive parallel computing at scale. Chapel's design and implementation have been undertaken with portability in mind, permitting Chapel to run on multicore desktops and laptops, commodity clusters, and the cloud, in addition to the high-end ... [More] supercomputers for which it was designed. Chapel's design and development are being led by Cray Inc. in collaboration with academia, computing centers, and industry. [Less]

245K lines of code

42 current contributors

21 days since last commit

5 users on Open Hub

Very High Activity
0.0
 
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Rascal MPL

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  Analyzed 4 months ago

Rascal is a domain specific language for source code analysis and manipulation a.k.a. meta-programming. It is currently being developed and tested at CWI. No formal release has been made yet, but there are alpha quality previews available.

403K lines of code

14 current contributors

5 months since last commit

5 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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Charm++

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  Analyzed 5 months ago

A portable adaptive runtime system for parallel applications. Application developers create an object-based decomposition of the problem of interest, and the runtime system manages issues of communication, mapping, load balancing, fault tolerance, and more. Sequential code implementing the ... [More] methods of these parallel objects is written in C++. Calls to libraries in C++, C, and Fortran are common and straightforward. Charm++ is portable across individual workstations, clusters, accelerators (Cell SPEs, GPUs), and supercomputers such as those sold by IBM (Blue Gene, POWER) and Cray (XT3/4/5/6 and XE6). Applications based on Charm++ are used on at least 5 of the 20 most powerful computers in the world. [Less]

617K lines of code

28 current contributors

5 months since last commit

3 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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PyvaScript

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  Analyzed 5 months ago

A simpler and more readable JavaScript syntax inspired by Python. Removes JavaScript's annoying bug sources: forgotten "var", semicolons, etc. Uses indentation and has multi-line lambdas.

3.77K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 2 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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geeny

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  Analyzed 5 months ago

Geeny is a scriptable game engine with built-in support for 2D, 3D graphics and sound. The scripting language is object oriented, high performance is attainable by using vector and array operations. Win32/Linux C++.

68.3K lines of code

0 current contributors

almost 11 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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Licenses: No declared licenses

Vuo

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  Analyzed about 2 months ago

Vuo is a realtime visual programming language for interactive media.

142K lines of code

1 current contributors

2 months since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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femtolisp

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  Analyzed 12 months ago

...a purely symbolic gesture...This project began with an attempt to write the fastest lisp interpreter I could in under 1000 lines of C. It snowballed from there as I kept trying to see if I could add powerful features with minimal code. At the same time I assembled a library of some of my favorite ... [More] C code (by myself and others) to use as a base for a standard library. This includes ios, a replacement for parts of C's stdio that adds more flexible features. Before you say "oh no, another lisp", consider the following: femtolisp is about 150kb, is very self-contained, and has the following features: vectors, strings, gensyms backquote exceptions printing and reading circular/shared structure all values can be printed readably prettyprinting hash tables support for directly using C data types ala Python's ctypes equal and ordered comparison predicates that work on circular structure proper tail recursion io and memory streams with utf8 support highly compatible with Scheme, including some R6RS features simple, well-organized, powerful API with as few functions as possible compacting GC and... ...it is fast, ranking among the fastest non-native-compiled Scheme implementations. It achieves this level of speed even though many primitives (like map) are written in the language instead of C. femtolisp uses a bytecode compiler and VM, with the compiler written in femtolisp. Bytecode is first-class, can be printed and read, and is "human readable" (the representation is a string of normal low-ASCII characters). femtolisp is a simple, elegant Scheme dialect. It is a lisp-1 with lexical scope. The core is 12 builtin special forms and 33 builtin functions. A primary design goal is to keep the code concise and interesting. I strive to have each concept implemented in just one place, so the system is easy to understand and modify. The result is high reliability, because there are fewer places for bugs to hide. You want a small core of generically useful features that work really well (for example, see torture.scm). Almost everybody has their own lisp implementation. Some programmers' dogs and cats probably have their own lisp implementations as well. This is great, but too often I see people omit some of the obscure but critical features that make lisp uniquely wonderful. These include read macros like #. and backreferences, gensyms, and properly escaped symbol names. If you're going to waste everybody's time with yet another lisp, at least do it right damnit. Another design goal is to avoid spurious novelties. Many others offering their own "shiny new" lisp dialects get carried away and change anything that strikes their fancy. These changes have no effect except incompatibility, and often make the language worse because the new design was not as carefully thought out and has not stood the test of time. For example, how does it help to remove backquote? One design changes the syntax of quote. Some systems disallow dotted lists. (I've seen all three of these.) What's the point? Implementers wave the banner of "simplicity", yet wedge in all kinds of weird implicit behaviors and extra evaluation rules. Lately a surprising amount of FUD has been spread about tail call optimization. I agree that not every language needs it, but I would like to refute the idea that it makes interpreters slow. Look at the "tiny" subdirectory or the "interpreter" branch to see a pure s-expr interpreter with efficient TCO. All you have to do is keep track of whether you're in tail position, which can be done very cheaply. These interpreters are difficult to beat for speed, yet they have lexical scope and TCO. This project is mostly a matter of style. Look at the code and you'll understand. This is what I do for fun, because it is the exact opposite of the kind of thing people will pay for: an obscure implementation of a programming language everybody hates. [Less]

38K lines of code

0 current contributors

about 5 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
0.0
 
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proty

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  Analyzed 5 months ago

A dynamic, prototype based programming language.

3.1K lines of code

0 current contributors

over 4 years since last commit

1 users on Open Hub

Activity Not Available
5.0
 
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